Special Report

This is How Much a Typical Home Costs in Vermont

For many, homeownership is the cornerstone of the American Dream. As of January 2021, a typical single-family home in the United States costs $269,039. Of course, home values are not uniform across the country, and in some states, the typical home costs far more than the national average — while in others, homes cost far less.

According to estimates from Zillow, a Seattle-based real estate data company, the value of a typical single-family home in Vermont is $277,364, about 3% higher than the national average.

Housing prices are determined by supply and demand forces as well as what local residents are willing to pay — and that is influenced largely by what they can afford. As a result, areas with higher than average home values often also have higher-income residents. Vermont is an exception, however. The typical household in the state earns $63,001 annually, $2,700 less than the national median household income of $65,712.

Just as home values are higher than average in Vermont, the overall cost of living is too. The average cost of goods and services across the state are 3% more than they do nationwide, on average.

Across Vermont, home values are climbing at a relatively slow pace. The value of a single-family home across the state increased by 6.06% over the one year period from January 2020 to January 2021, 3.05 percentage points slower than the average national one-year home value appreciation of 9.12%.

State: Value of a typical single-family home: 1-yr. increase in home value: Median household income:
Hawaii $683,470 4.7% $83,102
California $624,977 10.5% $80,440
Massachusetts $474,673 10.4% $85,843
Washington $470,304 12.7% $78,687
Colorado $442,766 8.6% $77,127
Oregon $402,573 10.0% $67,058
Utah $401,053 13.3% $75,780
New Jersey $376,866 10.6% $85,751
New York $350,545 7.7% $72,108
Idaho $348,483 18.9% $60,999
Maryland $341,148 8.5% $86,738
Rhode Island $340,811 11.9% $71,169
Nevada $332,501 8.6% $63,276
New Hampshire $330,976 12.4% $77,933
Montana $324,813 9.8% $57,153
Arizona $315,554 16.5% $62,055
Virginia $307,964 7.8% $76,456
Alaska $292,066 0.6% $75,463
Connecticut $288,822 11.5% $78,833
Delaware $284,787 9.6% $70,176
Minnesota $283,127 8.0% $74,593
Vermont $277,364 6.1% $63,001
Maine $276,023 12.3% $58,924
Florida $270,560 8.6% $59,227
Wyoming $262,517 3.6% $65,003
North Dakota $239,464 2.7% $64,577
New Mexico $229,947 11.0% $51,945
North Carolina $225,740 9.3% $57,341
South Dakota $225,662 5.7% $59,533
Texas $224,466 7.5% $64,034
Georgia $223,945 9.2% $61,980
Illinois $219,806 6.2% $69,187
Pennsylvania $215,939 9.6% $63,463
Wisconsin $213,537 9.6% $64,168
Tennessee $207,727 10.3% $56,071
South Carolina $206,647 7.9% $56,227
Nebraska $192,584 7.4% $63,229
Michigan $192,093 9.9% $59,584
Missouri $180,253 9.1% $57,409
Louisiana $178,987 4.5% $51,073
Indiana $172,769 9.3% $57,603
Ohio $168,226 10.4% $58,642
Kansas $167,540 8.1% $62,087
Kentucky $160,589 7.5% $52,295
Iowa $158,930 3.6% $61,691
Alabama $158,809 8.9% $51,734
Arkansas $142,070 6.7% $48,952
Oklahoma $141,933 7.2% $54,449
Mississippi $134,125 4.8% $45,792
West Virginia $113,626 4.7% $48,850

This is How Much Home You Can Buy For 200K in Every State

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