Media Digest (8/15/2011) Reuters, WSJ, NYTimes, FT, Bloomberg

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Time Warner (NYSE: TWC) to buy Insight Communications from Carlyle for $3 billion. (Reuters)

Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: ERTS) expects holiday sales to be strong. (Reuters)

Security experts say hackers may make Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) a target. (Reuters)

Investments banks believe that Computer Sciences (NYSE: CSC) is a break up candidate. (Reuters)

The move of computing to tablets has hurt Microsoft’s (NASDAQ: MSFT) future prospects. (WSJ)

Japan’s economy contracts by 1.5% in the past quarter. (WSJ)

Web video viewership takes market share from traditional TV. (WSJ)

Unions in Italy oppose austerity measures. (WSJ)

Sprint-Nextel (NYSE: S) will not launch the new Research In Motion (NASDAQ: RIMM) Playbook on its network as planned. (WSJ)

Aol’s (NYSE: AOL) content costs not matched by revenue. (WSJ)

Robert Zoellick, president of the World Bank, is concerned about trouble in global economies and finances. (WSJ)

Fires and drought in the South hurt timber production. (WSJ)

A downgrade of the debt of the Port Authority of New York may cause it to raise tolls. (WSJ)

US Airways (NYSE: LCC) is in a fight with its pilots over compensation. (WSJ)

Ralcorp (NYSE: RAH) rejects a new $5.2 billion bid from ConAgra (NYSE: CAG). (WSJ)

Mean workers make more money than those who are pleasant, according to research in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. (WSJ)

Third-quarter earnings to determine whether stocks are cheap. (WSJ)

More investors view Asian currencies as safe havens. (WSJ)

It will take some time before oil price drops bring down the price of gasoline. (WSJ)

Low output and austerity could drive Europe into a recession. (NYT)

Huge spikes in data use force wireless companies to charge more as networks become congested. (NYT)

Low interest rates have not helped consumer spending. (NYT)

Market turmoil helps CNBC’s audience numbers. (NYT)

Germany and France say there will be no sales of eurobonds. (FT)

U.S. manufacturers start to prepare for a double dip. (FT)

Low interest rates help commercial property rates to rise. (FT)

Warren Buffett suggests the U.S. raise taxes on the very rich. (Bloomberg)

Douglas A. McIntyre