Media

Media Digest (10/31/2011) Reuters, WSJ, FT, Bloomberg

Japan acts to lower the yen before the upcoming G20 meeting. (Reuters)

Beacon Power (NASDAQ: BCON), backed by U.S. funds, goes bankrupt. (Reuters)

Young and well-educated Greeks begin to leave the country. (Reuters)

Panasonic (NYSE: PC) cuts its annual earnings forecast. (Reuters)

MF Global’s (NYSE: MF) holding company may go bankrupt, with some assets sold to Interactive Brokers Group (NASDAQ: IBKR). (Reuters)

Many EU-based businesses have cut earnings forecasts as trouble in the region hurts the economy. (WSJ)

The U.S. may not sell more AIG (NYSE: AIG) stock until the share price rises. (WSJ)

Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) will not charge debit card fees similar to Bank of America’s (NYSE: BAC). (WSJ)

Gamestop (NYSE: GME) to sell PCs. (WSJ)

Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) has a new product to compete with Groupon. (WSJ)

Natural gas shale drilling  in Pennsylvania  prompts fight over who owns rights and land. (WSJ)

Sentier Research reports that American’s do not feel the recession is over. (WSJ)

Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) increases marketing messages to women. (WSJ)

Porsche posts strong earnings. (WSJ)

Aol (NYSE: AOL) wants to catch the balance of mobile portal products creators. (WSJ)

Honeywell (NYSE: HON) throws off substantial cash but is unlikely to add new employees. (WSJ)

Federal Reserve members are at odds about whether the central bank should do more to help the economy. (WSJ)

Cable companies continue to block use of web TV. (WSJ)

Nebraska may try to block the construction of a huge pipeline that would run from Canada to the southern U.S. (WSJ)

Large corporations to lobby the G20 for more unity on economic issues. (FT)

Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) will begin to use Xbox Kinect to deliver more than game services. New software may create medical devices. (FT)

Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi says he can set budget cuts to balance Italy’s books and that new elections are not necessary. (Bloomberg)

Honda’s (NYSE: HMC) numbers miss forecasts and it eliminates earnings estimates. (Bloomberg)

Douglas A. McIntyre