Cars With the Oldest Buyers

Print Email

7. Bentley
> Avg. age of buyer: 56.2 years
> 2013 U.S. unit sales: 2,663
> Unit sales pct. chg. (2012-2013): 17.7%

Like many other car brands popular among older drivers, British brand Bentley is a luxury car maker. In fact, Bentley is considered part of the super-luxury class of cars, which includes vehicles that can a price tag exceeding $200,000. Considering how expensive Bentleys are, it is not particularly surprising that Bentley’s target clientele may require the greater part of a lifetime to build up the necessary resources to afford one. Bentley sold 2,663 cars in the U.S. last year, up 401 from the year before.

6. Jaguar
> Avg. age of buyer: 56.6 years
> 2013 U.S. unit sales: 16,952
> Unit sales pct. chg. (2012-2013): 41.1%

Jaguar sales have grown considerably in recent years. The make sold nearly 17,000 cars in the U.S. last year, versus slightly more than 12,000 in 2012, a 41.1% increase and one of the largest sales increases nationwide. According to Kelley Blue Book’s Brauer, not only has Jaguar improved its product considerably, but it is also a classic luxury brand. Like other high-end makes reviewed, Jaguars are often quite expensive. Even the most affordable Jaguar starts at well over $50,000. Land Rover and Jaguar were combined into one company last year by their parent, Tata Motors. The average age of a Jaguar buyer, however, has changed little in recent years, remaining between 56 and 57 years old.

ALSO READ: America’s Most Polluted Housing Markets

5. Lexus
> Avg. age of buyer: 56.9 years
> 2013 U.S. unit sales: 273,847
> Unit sales pct. chg. (2012-2013): 12.2%

Like several cars on this list, Lexus is both a luxury brand and a popular one among older car buyers. Lexus reported a 12.2% increase in U.S. sales last year from the year before, among the higher growth rates nationwide. However, Lexus — Japanese carmaker Toyota’s (NYSE: TM) premium brand — still trailed its German competitors in terms of worldwide market share and sales. Lexus also trails its German rivals in the U.S. as well. Lexus sold less than 275,000 vehicles in America last year, while German luxury brands such as BMW and Mercedes each sold well over 300,000 units.