America’s Most Popular Governors

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25. Gov. John Kasich (R) of Ohio
> Approval rating: 49%
> Disapproval rating: 32%
> Tenure: 8 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 4.6% (7th highest)

Republican John Kasich was elected governor of Ohio twice, first in 2010 and again 2014. He was barred by state law from seeking a third term. Republican Mike DeWine will become governor in January 2019 after defeating Democrat Richard Cordray in the November elections.

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24. Gov. Roy Cooper (D) of North Carolina
> Approval rating: 49%
> Disapproval rating: 29%
> Tenure: 2 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 3.6% (22nd lowest)

Democrat Roy Cooper took office in January 2017, after narrowly defeating incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory in the November 2016 general election. Cooper is up for re-election in 2020.

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23. Gov. Henry McMaster (R) of South Carolina
> Approval rating: 49%
> Disapproval rating: 29%
> Tenure: 2 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 3.3% (15th lowest)

Republican Henry McMaster was elected lieutenant governor of South Carolina in 2014 and took the top job when former Gov. Nikki Haley was confirmed as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in January 2017. In November, McMaster defeated Democratic challenger James Smith. He will be sworn in for a four-year term in January 2019.

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22. Gov. Phil Scott (R) of Vermont
> Approval rating: 50%
> Disapproval rating: 38%
> Tenure: 2 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 2.7% (5th lowest)

In Vermont, governors are up for re-election every two years. First sworn in in January 2017, Republican Phil Scott handily defeated Democratic challenger Christine Hallquist in November 2018.

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21. Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) of Colorado
> Approval rating: 50%
> Disapproval rating: 32%
> Tenure: 8 years
> Nov. 2018 state unemployment: 3.3% (15th lowest)

Democrat John Hickenlooper served as governor of Colorado for two consecutive terms, the maximum allowed under state law. Democrat Jared Polis took the top job in January 2019 after winning the in the November 2018 elections.