Special Report

The Best Seafood to Eat

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6. Tilapia
> Benefit: Low in calories, high in protein and other nutrients
> Farmed or wild-caught: Farmed

While farm-raised tilapia from China may be contaminated with toxins and is farmed in ways that negatively impact the environment, the equivalent from the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, Peru, and Ecuador is recommended. It is a particularly good source of vitamin D and cobalamin, a B-complex vitamin. Wild tilapia is rarely sold.

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7. Pacific cod
> Benefit: Low in calories, high in protein and other nutrients
> Farmed or wild-caught: Wild-caught

Since the 1990s, overfishing has pushed Atlantic cod to the brink of extinction, though rebuilding plans have been in process for the last few years and cod numbers are expected to recover in this decade. Pacific populations, however, are stable, and this popular flaky fish is a good source of protein, phosphorus, and vitamin D.

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8. Pacific flounder
> Benefit: Low in calories, high in protein
> Farmed or wild-caught: Wild-caught

A versatile flatfish, flounder is less dense than many other fish, and therefore delivers fewer vitamins and minerals. It is an abundant source of “complete” protein, though, meaning that it contains all the essential amino acids, especially leucine and lysine. Avoid Atlantic flounder, whose stocks are threatened by overfishing, and which may contain toxins.

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9. Pacific sole
> Benefit: Low in calories, high in protein
> Farmed or wild-caught: Wild-caught

Sole is a popular flatfish similar to flounder, mild-tasting and full of protein. As with flounder, fish caught in the Atlantic may be problematic for both health and environmental reasons.

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10. Shrimp
> Benefit: High in protein, low in calories and mercury
> Farmed or wild-caught: Farmed or wild-caught

Hugely popular around the world, shrimp is low in fatty acids, but is a good source of protein, iodine, and potassium. Imported farm-raised shrimp should be avoided, especially that from Southeast Asia, which may contain toxins and have negative environmental impact. Only about 10% of the shrimp eaten in America is wild-caught, but it is generally more flavorful than farmed.