Media Digest (12/21/2011) Reuters, WSJ, FT, Bloomberg

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Prosecutors raid Olympus to gain data in a probe of the accounting scandal at the company. (Reuters)

Bank of Japan says it will hold to current policies as the economy in the Asian nation has weakened. (Reuters)

Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN) considered buying Research In Motion (NASDAQ: RIMM). (Reuters)

Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: ERTS) puts a large investment into its new Star Wars: The Old Republic. (Reuters)

The Federal Reserve offers new rules to cut risk-taking by U.S. banks. (Reuters)

Oracle (NASDAQ: ORCL) misses estimates and shares fall 8%. (Reuters)

AT&T (NYSE: T) may buy Clearwire (NASDAQ: CLWR) or Dish Network (NASDAQ: DISH) now that its T-Mobile bid is over. (Reuters)

HTC begins to test new models after a patent suit loss to Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL). (Reuters)

Credit Suisse (NYSE: CS) buys HSBC’s (NYSE: HBC) Japan private bank. (Reuters)

Chinese hackers hit the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. (WSJ)

Some $200 million may have been transferred from MF Global accounts to JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM). (WSJ)

Nokia (NYSE: NOK) and Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) considered a bid for RIM. (WSJ)

Wendy’s (NYSE: WEN) may pass Burger King in sales. (WSJ)

Honda (NYSE: HMC) to shift more production to the North America. (WSJ)

A lack of action by Congress could raise payroll taxes to 6.2% and eliminate long-term unemployment payments. (WSJ)

Fund Starboard Value attacks Aol (NYSE: AOL) for its ongoing plans to invest in content. (WSJ)

LightSquared pushes the FCC to approve its service, which some think interferes with GPS devices. (WSJ)

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission says firms must disclose data on trading over-the-counter securities. (WSJ)

Bill Gross’s Total Return Fund will have its first outflow since 1987. (WSJ)

Spain’s borrowing costs drop as it auctions new bonds. (WSJ)

EU banks probably will take advantage of new European Central Bank loans. (FT)

Troubled EU banks sell more mortgage securities. (FT)

French banks will try to raise $48 billion to satisfy debt needs. (Bloomberg)

Douglas A. McIntyre