Most Dangerous States to Drive

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20. Florida
> Road deaths per 100,000:
12.3
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 2,407
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 87%

Seatbelt use in Florida is roughly in line with the national average. Similarly, the 34% of drivers killed with a blood alcohol content greater than or equal to 0.08% is roughly in line with the corresponding national share. However, with 12.3 deaths for every 100,000 residents, fatal road accidents are more common in Florida than they are across the country — where the corresponding rate is 10.3 deaths per 100,000 residents.

19. Missouri
> Road deaths per 100,000:
12.5
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 757
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 80%

There were 12.5 deaths on the road for every 100,000 state residents in 2013, making Missouri more dangerous to drive in than the country on average. Additionally, as in many of the states with the highest rate of roadway fatalities, a higher share of miles driven in Missouri were on rural roads, 41% compared to 32% nationally. Drivers and passengers in Missouri were less likely to use a seatbelt. While about 87% of Americans use a seatbelt, only 80% in Missouri buckle up.

18. Arizona
> Road deaths per 100,000:
12.8
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 849
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 85%

With 12.8 deaths for every 100,000 state residents, fatal accidents on the road are more common in Arizona than they are across the United States, where the corresponding rate is 10.3 deaths per 100,000 residents.

Arizona’s worse than average outcomes came despite the fact that 77% of miles driven in the state are on urban roads. Nationally, only 68% of miles driven are in urban areas. Seatbelt use in Arizona is roughly in line with the nation. While 87% of Americans buckle up, 85% of people in Arizona use a seatbelt.

17. Texas
> Road deaths per 100,000:
12.8
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 3,382
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 90%

Only about 31% of miles driven in Texas in 2013 were in rural areas, an unusually small share for a states with higher than average motor vehicle-related fatalities. However, speed limits on highways in the Lone Star State are among the highest in the nation — as high as 85 mph. Accidents at higher speeds are much more likely to result in fatal injury.

The car crash fatality rate of 12.8 deaths for every 100,000 residents on Texas roads is higher than the national rate of 10.3 fatalities for every 100,000 residents.

16. North Carolina
> Road deaths per 100,000:
13.1
> Total roadway fatalities in 2013: 1,289
> Pct. of residents using seatbelt: 89%

The car crash fatality rate of 13.1 deaths each year per 100,000 North Carolina residents is higher than the national rate of 10.3 fatalities for every 100,000 residents. The state’s higher than average fatality rate is partially attributable to environment. Across the country, rural roadways are much more dangerous than urban ones. While 39% of total vehicle miles traveled in North Carolina are in rural areas, only 32% of miles driven across the country are in rural areas.