Special Report

Each State's Official Tree

WerksMedia / Getty Images

If there is one thing all 50 states have in common, it is their zeal in designating official state symbols or icons.

States assign their official imprimatur to plants, minerals, dinosaurs, pets, songs, and flowers. And, of course, all 50 have a state tree. All of these state trees, with the exception of Hawaii’s, are native to that state.

According to the United States National Arboretum in Washington, D.C., a state tree is often connected to the state by historical events, uses of trees by settlers, or the importance of the timber industry to a state’s economy.

Most states adopted their state trees following the nation’s rapid industrial and agricultural expansion in the 1800s and early 1900s. Without a strong conservation movement to oppose rapacious deforestation, many of the original forests were stripped for building materials, fuelwood, or to clear land for crops and livestock.

In recognition of Arbor Day on April 27, 24/7 Wall St. salutes the official tree in every state.

Click here to see the official tree in each state.
Click here to see our detailed findings and methodology.

Source: Wirepec / Getty Images

1. Alabama
> State tree(s): Southern Longleaf Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus palustris
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1997

[in-text-ad]

Source: ChrisBeverly2070 / iStock

2. Alaska
> State tree(s): Sitka Spruce
> Scientific name: Picea sitchensis
> Maximum height: 180 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1962

Source: EuToch / Getty Images

3. Arizona
> State tree(s): Palo Verde
> Scientific name: Parkinsonia florida
> Maximum height: 40 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1954

Source: RoschetzkyIstockPhoto / Getty Images

4. Arkansas
> State tree(s): Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus taeda
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1939

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: Scott_Walton / Getty Images

5. California
> State tree(s): California Redwood
> Scientific name: Sequoia sempervirens/Sequoiadendron giganteum
> Maximum height: 250+ feet
> Named the state tree in: 1937

Source: rootstocks / Getty Images

6. Colorado
> State tree(s): Colorado Blue Spruce
> Scientific name: Picea pungens
> Maximum height: 75 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1939

[in-text-ad]

Source: WilshireImages / iStock

7. Connecticut
> State tree(s): The Charter Oak
> Scientific name: Quercus albus
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

Source: Photo (c)2007 Derek Ramsey (Ram-Man) / Wikimedia Commons

8. Delaware
> State tree(s): American Holly
> Scientific name: Ilex opaca Alton
> Maximum height: 30 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1939

Source: LVV / Getty Images

9. Florida
> State tree(s): Sabal Palm
> Scientific name: Sabal palmetto
> Maximum height: 20 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1953

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: traveler1116 / Getty Images

10. Georgia
> State tree(s): Live Oak
> Scientific name: Quercus virginiana
> Maximum height: 80 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1937

Source: Tina Power / Getty Images

11. Hawaii
> State tree(s): Kukui
> Scientific name: Aleurites moluccana
> Maximum height: 60 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1959

[in-text-ad]

Source: knowlesgallery / Getty Images

12. Idaho
> State tree(s): Western White Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus monticola pinaceae
> Maximum height: 175 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1935

Source: stevegeer / Getty Images

13. Illinois
> State tree(s): White Oak
> Scientific name: Quercus alba
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1973

Source: magicflute002 / Getty Images

14. Indiana
> State tree(s): Tulip Poplar
> Scientific name: Liriodendron tulipifera
> Maximum height: 90 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1931

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: lynngrae / Getty Images

15. Iowa
> State tree(s): Oak
> Scientific name: Quercus macrocarpa
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1961

Source: marekuliasz / Getty Images

16. Kansas
> State tree(s): Cottonwood
> Scientific name: Populus deltoides
> Maximum height: 190 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1937

[in-text-ad]

Source: mtreasure / Getty Images

17. Kentucky
> State tree(s): Tulip Poplar
> Scientific name: Liriodendron tulipifera
> Maximum height: 90 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1994

Source: MSMcCarthy_Photography / iStock

18. Louisiana
> State tree(s): Bald Cypress
> Scientific name: Taxodium distichum
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1963

Source: GeorgeBurba / Getty Images

19. Maine
> State tree(s): White Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus strobus
> Maximum height: 100+ feet
> Named the state tree in: 1945

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: Joesboy / Getty Images

20. Maryland
> State tree(s): White Oak
> Scientific name: Quercus alba
> Maximum height: 100 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1941

Source: PierceHSmith / iStock

21. Massachusetts
> State tree(s): American Elm
> Scientific name: Ulmus americana
> Maximum height: 90 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1941

[in-text-ad]

Source: duckycards / Getty Images

22. Michigan
> State tree(s): Eastern White Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus strobus
> Maximum height: 100+ feet
> Named the state tree in: 1955

Source: KeithBenard / Getty Images

23. Minnesota
> State tree(s): Red Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus resinosa
> Maximum height: 90 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1953

Source: Kenneth_Keifer / Getty Images

24. Mississippi
> State tree(s): Magnolia
> Scientific name: Magnolia grandiflora
> Maximum height: 80 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1952

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: nickkurzenko / Getty Images

25. Missouri
> State tree(s): Flowering Dogwood
> Scientific name: Cornus florida
> Maximum height: 40 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1955

Source: sstaton / Getty Images

26. Montana
> State tree(s): Ponderosa Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus ponderosa
> Maximum height: 200+ feet
> Named the state tree in: 1949

[in-text-ad]

Source: marekuliasz / Getty Images

27. Nebraska
> State tree(s): Cottonwood
> Scientific name: Populus deltoides
> Maximum height: 190 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1972

Source: AvatarKnowmad / Getty Images

28. Nevada
> State tree(s): Single-Leaf Piñon and Bristlecone Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus monophylla & Pinus longaeva
> Maximum height: 50 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1987

Source: johnandersonphoto / Getty Images

29. New Hampshire
> State tree(s): White Birch
> Scientific name: Betula papyrifera
> Maximum height: 70 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: Whiteway / Getty Images

30. New Jersey
> State tree(s): Northern Red Oak and Dogwood
> Scientific name: Quercus borealis maxima and Cornus
> Maximum height: 90 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1950

Source: Heather_Szarka / iStock

31. New Mexico
> State tree(s): Piñon Pine
> Scientific name: Pinus edulis
> Maximum height: 35 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1948

[in-text-ad]

Source: Ron_Thomas / Getty Images

32. New York
> State tree(s): Sugar Maple
> Scientific name: Acer saccharum
> Maximum height: 115 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1956

Source: MarkWagonerProductions / Getty Images

33. North Carolina
> State tree(s): Fraser Fir and Pine Tree
> Scientific name: Abies fraseri and Pinus
> Maximum height: 40 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1963

Source: Unimatic1140 / Wikimedia Commons

34. North Dakota
> State tree(s): American Elm
> Scientific name: Ulmus americana
> Maximum height: 90 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: NajaShots / Getty Images

35. Ohio
> State tree(s): Ohio Buckeye
> Scientific name: Aesculus glabra
> Maximum height: 82 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1953

Source: aquatarkus / iStock

36. Oklahoma
> State tree(s): Redbud
> Scientific name: Cercis canadensis
> Maximum height: 30 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1937

[in-text-ad]

Source: RyanJLane / Getty Images

37. Oregon
> State tree(s): Douglas Fir
> Scientific name: Pseudotsuga menziesii
> Maximum height: 325 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1939

Source: Wirepec / Getty Images

38. Pennsylvania
> State tree(s): Eastern Hemlock
> Scientific name: Tsuga canadensis
> Maximum height: 80 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1931

Source: ClubhouseArts / Getty Images

39. Rhode Island
> State tree(s): Red Maple
> Scientific name: Acer rubrum
> Maximum height: 115 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1964

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: digidreamgrafix / Getty Images

40. South Carolina
> State tree(s): Sabal Palmetto
> Scientific name: Inodes Palmetto
> Maximum height: 82 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1939

Source: YinYang / Getty Images

41. South Dakota
> State tree(s): Black Hills Spruce
> Scientific name: Picea glauca
> Maximum height: 40 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

[in-text-ad]

Source: seven75 / iStock

42. Tennessee
> State tree(s): Tulip Poplar and Yellowwood Tree
> Scientific name: Liriodendron tulipifera
> Maximum height: 70 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

Source: pelicankate / Getty Images

43. Texas
> State tree(s): Pecan Tree
> Scientific name: Carya illinoinensis
> Maximum height: 140 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1919

Source: MagicDreamer / Getty Images

44. Utah
> State tree(s): Quaking Aspen
> Scientific name: Populus tremuloides
> Maximum height: 50 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1933

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: Ron_Thomas / Getty Images

45. Vermont
> State tree(s): Sugar Maple
> Scientific name: Acer saccharum
> Maximum height: 115 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1949

Source: Flowering Dogwood / Getty Images

46. Virginia
> State tree(s): Flowering Dogwood
> Scientific name: Cornus florida
> Maximum height: 40 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1918

[in-text-ad]

Source: gdbrekke / Getty Images

47. Washington
> State tree(s): Western Hemlock
> Scientific name: Tsuga heterophylla
> Maximum height: 200 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

Source: aimintang / Getty Images

48. West Virginia
> State tree(s): Sugar Maple
> Scientific name: Acer saccharum
> Maximum height: 115 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1949

Source: lipika / Getty Images

49. Wisconsin
> State tree(s): Sugar Maple
> Scientific name: Acer saccharum
> Maximum height: 115 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1949

[in-text-ad-2]

Source: RCarner / iStock

50. Wyoming
> State tree(s): Plains Cottonwood
> Scientific name: Populus deltoides
> Maximum height: 190 feet
> Named the state tree in: 1947

Detailed Findings & Methodology

Trees have long been the beloved subject of poets such as Joyce Kilmer, Robert Frost, and William Makepeace Thackeray, but they still needed a champion. Eventually, forest and tree preservation concerns prompted conservation efforts.

In the early part of the 20th century, states began to recognize trees indigenous to their state and started designating them official state trees. Virginia was the first state to name an official tree when it named the Flowering Dogwood in 1918. Alabama was the last to do so, designating the Southern Longleaf Pine as its official tree in 1997. Half of all the official trees were named in the 1930s and 1940s.

If you can’t get to all 50 states to see each state tree, you can see all 50 state trees in Washington, D.C., at The National Grove of State Trees, a 30-acre attraction at the United States National Arboretum.

Planting for the grove began in 1989 and was a collaboration of the National Association of State Foresters, the American Forest Foundation, the USDA Forest Service, and the U.S. National Arboretum.

Institutions such as the national arboretum raise awareness about tree population as concerns about deforestation persist. According to a study by Nature magazine three years ago, there are 3.04 trillion trees on our planet, or 422 trees for every person on Earth. In the U.S., there are 716 trees for every person. Those numbers were a pleasant surprise to scientists. But the study also found that there are 46% fewer trees since deforestation was begun by mankind.

24/7 Wall St. compiled a list of each state’s official tree from online sources, including state websites, media outlets, and information from United States National Arboretum and Nature magazine.

Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor

Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

Thank you for reading! Have some feedback for us?
Contact the 24/7 Wall St. editorial team.