States Where the Most People Still Live With Their Parents

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In the United States, adulthood is a legal designation that generally means parents are no longer obligated to support their son or daughter. Adulthood begins at age 18 throughout most of the country — one to three years later in a handful of states — and is a milestone often met with an eagerness to embrace newfound independence.

However, an increasing number of Americans are choosing to stay home with mom and dad well into adulthood. And, as Americans are leaving the nest later in life, they are also delaying other life milestones — notably marriage and homeownership.

The share of Americans age 18 to 34 living with at least one parent climbed from 29.0% in 2006 to 34.4% in 2016 — a 5.4 percentage point increase. In fact, the share of young adults choosing to live under the same roof as their parents has gone up in every state except Alaska in the last 10 years.

Depending on the region, staying at home is either relatively uncommon, or is a given for a large segment of the population. The share of children living with their parents ranges from less than 25% in some states to more than 40% in others. The social and economic differences between states offer at least a partial explanation for this phenomenon. For example, states with the largest shares of young adults living with mom and dad tend to be more expensive places to live.

24/7 Wall St. reviewed the share of 18- to 34-year-olds that live with their parents in each state.

Click here to see the states where the most people live with their parents.
Click here to see our detailed findings and methodology.