25 Most Dangerous Jobs in America

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25. Electricians
> Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.4 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 74 fatal injuries, 4,890 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips
> Median annual wage: $54,110

Electricians fix and install power, communications, lighting, and control systems in homes, businesses, factories, and more. While electrical burns might be expected to be the most common fatal injury among electricians, it was actually falls, slips, and trips that accounted for the highest share of the 74 fatal accidents experienced by the group last year. About 1.0% of injuries incurred on the job are fatal, nearly twice the 0.6% national average.

Electricians may also be required to work in cramped spaces, standing or kneeling for long period of times, which can result in injury or disability in the long term.

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24. Firefighters
> Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.9 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 34 fatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $49,080

As of last year, there were over 300,000 American firefighters, just over two thirds of which were volunteers, meaning they were employed on a retainer basis. These men and women have one of the deadliest work environments of any occupation. Firefighters are at risk of injury or death due to burns, smoke inhalation, and collapsing structures.

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23. Painters, Construction and Maintenance
> Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.9 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 44 fatal injuries, 4,200 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips
> Median annual wage: $37,960

Construction and maintenance painters apply paint, stain, and other coatings to buildings and other structures. They often work in demanding or dangerous environments and can sustain injury from lifting heavy objects and exposure to chemicals and other irritants. The most common cause of fatal injury among professional painters is alls and trips while working on ladders or other elevated locations.

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22. Athletes, Coaches, Umpires, and Related Workers
> Fatal injuries in 2017: 9.5 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 24 fatal injuries, 3,170 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $32,200

Few would be surprised that injuries are relatively common in the field of professional sports. As time passes, it becomes more and more clear that the long-term effects of repeated concussions, for example, are serious and grim. The average career span of professional athletes in most major sports ranges from three to six years, and one reason for this is the heavy toll elite sports take on the body.

Athletes must travel frequently for work, and while injuries on the field and in training are common, it is accidents during travel that most commonly result in fatalities.

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21. Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs
> Fatal injuries in 2017: 10.5 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 62 fatal injuries, 2,640 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $24,880

Believe it or not, getting into a car is one of the most dangerous things people do every day. And for those who drive professionally, risks can be especially high. Not surprisingly, vehicle accidents are the most common cause of fatalities for taxi drivers and chauffeurs.

However, a large share of fatalities, about 35%, are the result of violence by other people or animals. Taxi drivers often work late hours and are exposed to potentially dangerous people. They also have a homicide rate over 20 times that of the average worker, according to OSHA.