25 Healthiest Cities in America

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20. Corvallis, OR
> Premature death rate: 228.6 (per 100,000)
> Adult obesity rate: 24.4%
> Pct. under 65 without health insurance: N/A
> Median household income: $55,459

Adults in Corvallis, Oregon, are among of the healthiest in the nation and are less likely to die before age 75 than the average American. Corvallis residents die prematurely — before the age of 75 — at a rate of 228 for every 100,000 metro area residents, considerably less than the 363 premature deaths per 100,000 Americans. Corvallis adults can partially attribute the lower premature death rate to their healthy habits. Nearly 89% of adults in this metro area lead physically active lifestyles, the third highest share in the nation. Additionally, Corvallis’ adult obesity and smoking rates are considerably lower than the comparable national figures.

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19. Appleton, WI
> Premature death rate: 268.2 (per 100,000)
> Adult obesity rate: 30.3%
> Pct. under 65 without health insurance: 5.2%
> Median household income: $63,902

Like most of the healthiest cities in the country, only a small share of residents in Appleton, Wisconsin, are not financially secure. Only 7.6% of residents live in poverty, almost half the nationwide poverty rate of 14.0%. Affluent cities tend to have relatively few people who lack access to affordable, nutritious food. In Appleton, only 3.9% of residents are food insecure, one of the lowest shares in the nation.

Exercising regularly can also help lower the risk of chronic health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, and promote a long, healthy life. Some 90.7% of Appleton residents have access to recreational facilities or parks, and residents clearly take advantage of this opportunity. Just over 80% of adults report they are physically active, more than the 77% of Americans who are active nationwide. Physical activity can lead to good health, and nearly 90% of the area’s adults report they are in good health, one of the highest shares of any metropolitan area.

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18. Mankato-North Mankato, MN
> Premature death rate: 250.0 (per 100,000)
> Adult obesity rate: 33.3%
> Pct. under 65 without health insurance: N/A
> Median household income: $57,833

Adults in Mankato-North Mankato, Minnesota, are among of the healthiest in the nation. Area residents die prematurely — before the age of 75 — at a rate of 250 for every 100,000 metro area residents, considerably less than the 363 premature deaths per 100,000 Americans. In addition, adults in this area report only an average of 3.1 mentally unhealthy days per month, one of the lowest shares nationwide. Healthy behavior among Mankato adults is likely contributing to the region’s low premature death rate and better mental health. Adults in this Minnesota metro area are more likely to exercise and less likely to smoke.

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17. St. George, UT
> Premature death rate: 263.1 (per 100,000)
> Adult obesity rate: 24.3%
> Pct. under 65 without health insurance: 15.4%
> Median household income: $55,056

Only 11.5% of adults in the St. George area report being in fair or poor health, a smaller share than in all but a handful of other U.S. metro areas. The better self-reported health outcomes are likely the result of area residents’ healthy behaviors and lifestyles. Only 24.3% of adults are obese, far less than the national rate of 28.0%. Even more impressive, however, is the metro area’s low smoking rate. Some 7.7% of adults in St. George smoke, the second lowest rate in the nation.

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16. Urban Honolulu, HI
> Premature death rate: 270.3 (per 100,000)
> Adult obesity rate: 22.2%
> Pct. under 65 without health insurance: 4.4%
> Median household income: $80,513

Employment can be a significant factor in maintaining good health for several reasons. Those with steady employment do not have to stress about earning a regular income, and often have health insurance provided by their place of work. Only 2.2% of the workforce in Urban Honolulu is out of a job, the second lowest unemployment rate of any U.S. metropolitan area. Honolulu’s low unemployment likely contributes to its higher health insurance coverage rate and lower poverty rate. Only 4.4% of the metro area’s population under 65 years is uninsured, and 8.5% live in poverty, well below the corresponding national rates of 11.0% and 14.0%. Those with health insurance coverage tend to have better access to medical and preventive care.