Special Report

The Net Worth of the American Presidents: Washington to Trump

Source: National Archives / Newsmakers / Getty Images

John Quincy Adams
> Term: 1825-1829 (6th president)
> Peak net worth (in current dollars): $23.3 million

Adams inherited most of his father’s land. His wife was the daughter of a wealthy merchant. He devoted most of his adult life to public service, notably after leaving office.

Source: Hulton Archive / Getty Images

Andrew Jackson
> Term: 1829-1837 (7th president)
> Peak net worth (in current dollars): $132.6 million

While he was considered to be in touch with the average middle class American, Jackson quietly became one of the wealthiest presidents of the 1800’s. “Old Hickory” married into wealth and made money in the military. His homestead ”The Hermitage” included 1,050 acres of prime real estate. Over the course of his life, he owned as many as 300 slaves.

Source: National Archives / Newsmakers

Martin Van Buren
> Term: 1837-1841 (8th president)
> Peak net worth (in current dollars): $29.3 million

Van Buren made substantial income as an attorney. He was one of only two men to serve as secretary of state, vice president, and president. He owned the 225-acre “Lindenwald” estate in upstate New York.

Source: National Archive / Newsmakers

William Henry Harrison
> Term: 1841 (9th president)
> Peak net worth (in current dollars): $6.1 million

Harrison married into money – his wife’s father was a prominent judge and landowner. When Harrison’s mother died, he inherited 3,000 acres near Charles City, Virginia, which he later sold to his brother. He also owned “Grouseland” mansion and property in Vincennes, Indiana. Despite his assets, Harrison died penniless, causing Congress to create a special pension for his widow.

Source: Hulton Archive / Getty Images

John Tyler
> Term: 1841-1845 (10th president)
> Peak net worth (in current dollars): $57.7 million

Tyler inherited a 1,000-acre tobacco plantation. His first wife, Letitia, was wealthy. Tyler bought “Sherwood Manor,” a 1,600 acre estate, previously owned by William Henry Harrison. He became indebted during the Civil War and died poor.