Most Dangerous City in Every State

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Montana: Helena
> 2017 violent crimes per 100,000 people: 685 (state: 377)
> Number of violent crimes in 2017: 217 (5.5% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 15.6% (state: 14.4%)
> Annual unemployment: 3.1% (state: 3.7%)

Helena’s violent crime rate of 685 incidents per 100,000 people is the highest of any city tracked by the FBI in Montana. Across the state as a whole, there were 377 violent crimes for every 100,000 people in 2017. As is typically the case, aggravated assault was the most common type of violent crime in Montana’s capital city in 2017. Of the 217 violent crimes committed in Helena that year, 137 were aggravated assaults. There was only one murder in the city in 2017.

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Nebraska: Omaha
> 2017 violent crimes per 100,000 people: 647 (state: 306)
> Number of violent crimes in 2017: 2,909 (49.5% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 15.1% (state: 12.0%)
> Annual unemployment: 3.1% (state: 2.8%)

Of Nebraska’s three major cities, Norfolk and Bellevue have very low violent crime rates, less than 150 per 100,000 each. Omaha, by far the state’s largest urban area, has a violent crime rate of nearly 650 incidents per 100,000 people. While high poverty and high unemployment are frequently common in places with high crime, Omaha’s poverty rate and unemployment rate are both close to the national figures.

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Nevada: North Las Vegas
> 2017 violent crimes per 100,000 people: 1,015 (state: 556)
> Number of violent crimes in 2017: 2,461 (14.8% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 15.1% (state: 14.2%)
> Annual unemployment: 5.3% (state: 4.6%)

There were 1,015 violent crimes for every 100,000 people in North Las Vegas in 2017, nearly double the violent crime rate of 556 per 100,000 across the state as a whole. The high overall violent crime rate in the city is driven largely by robberies and aggravated assaults.

Crime rates are often higher in areas with limited economic opportunity. In North Las Vegas, the annual unemployment rate is 5.3%, the highest of any Nevada city tracked by the FBI.

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New Hampshire: Manchester
> 2017 violent crimes per 100,000 people: 673 (state: 199)
> Number of violent crimes in 2017: 745 (27.9% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 14.9% (state: 8.1%)
> Annual unemployment: 2.6% (state: 2.5%)

New Hampshire’s violent crime rate of 199 incidents per 100,000 people is among the lowest of any state in the country. Not all parts of the state are especially safe, however. In Manchester, there were 673 violent crimes for every 100,000 people in 2017, well above the national violent crime rate of 383 per 100,000. There were only 14 murders reported in New Hampshire in 2017. Two of them were committed in Manchester.

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New Jersey: Camden
> 2017 violent crimes per 100,000 people: 1,968 (state: 229)
> Number of violent crimes in 2017: 1,462 (7.1% of state total)
> Poverty rate: 37.4% (state: 10.7%)
> Annual unemployment: 8.9% (state: 4.1%)

Like several other Northeastern states, New Jersey is a low-crime state with some relatively dangerous cities. There were 229 violent crimes for every 100,000 people in New Jersey in 2017, well below the national violent crime rate of 383 per 100,000. In Camden, a small city just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, violence is much more common. There were 1,968 violent crimes for every 100,000 people in Camden in 2017, by far the highest violent crime rate of any city in the state.

Crime is often concentrated in areas with limited economic opportunity. Camden’s 8.9% annual unemployment rate is the highest of any city in New Jersey and more than double the 4.1% state unemployment rate