Special Report

20 Major Myths About COVID-19

The world first learned about COVID-19 in December 2019. The World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic in March. Since then, news of the novel virus and the disease it causes have been dominating nearly every media platform, including social media and internet sites, where health misinformation has spread faster than the coronavirus.

24/7 Tempo reviewed information from the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health and other organizations that focus on health news to compile a list of 20 popular, and some even dangerous, myths about COVID-19 people should stop believing.

There has been a surge of coronavirus infections in every state in the country. New daily COVID-19 cases are reaching over 200,000 nationwide. And more than 3,000 people died on Dec. 9 — the highest single-day death toll since the pandemic began.

With dire news about the pandemic trends, it may be tempting to believe certain claims, but it can also be harmful. For example, injecting or swallowing bleach or other disinfectants as well bathing in them or rubbing them over the body is not only an ineffective way to prevent infection, but it is also dangerous.

And then there are myths that believe to be dangerous, though they can actually be an effective preventative measure. For example, a rumor that wearing masks for a long time can cause carbon dioxide toxicity has been circulating online for months. This is false. Masks remain one of the most recommended preventive measures, especially when social distancing is more difficult.

SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 — is a novel virus. And although scientists have been studying it for about a year, there are still many unknowns. Still, some questions concerning public health and the coronavirus have been answered — here are 17 health questions about COVID-19 answered.

Click here to see the major myths about COVID-19