Technology

What's Up With Apple: iPhone Security Patches, DIY NFT, and More

Last Thursday, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) released a security update for its iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch operating systems. The patches are numbered iOS 14.4.2 for the iPhone, iPadOS 14.4.2 and watchOS 7.3.3. Apple also has released patches for operating systems on older devices, including iPhone 5S, 6 and 6 Plus, along with several iPads and the 6th generation iPod touch.

According to the Apple Support site, the patch fixes a hole in the operating systems that processes “maliciously crafted web content [and] may lead to universal cross site scripting.” Apple said it has received a “report that this issue may have been actively exploited.” What this means is that an infected device could, for example, direct people to a phishing site that could harvest personal data. Apple recommends installing the update.

Want to get on the non-fungible token (NFT) craze? There’s an app for that. It’s called S!NG, it’s free and you can use it to create your own NFT that you could sell for millions of Ethereum or other cryptocurrencies.

You create the NFT by uploading a piece of art that you have created. The app does not require that people have an Ethereum account and automatically begins creating an NFT of the upload by sending it to the blockchain and then storing it in your catalog in the app. According to 9to5Mac, NFTs stored in a S!NG account can be sold on the Open Sea platform.

A new Apple-funded study by researchers at Stanford University indicates that an iPhone or Apple Watch with the VascTrac app was found to be nearly as effective at collecting passive data from cardiovascular disease patients as was clinic-based treatment. According to a report at MyHealthyApple, “passive activity data acquired by an iPhone and Apple Watch are an accurate predictor of in-clinic 6MWT performance.”

The 6MWT is a six-minute walk test used by physicians to measure aerobic capacity and endurance. The research was conducted on 110 Veterans Affairs patients who used the Apple devices and whose data was compared to data collected in the clinic.

Apple reportedly is considering releasing a ruggedized version of Apple Watch for people who use the smartwatch in extreme environments. According to a report from Bloomberg citing knowledgeable sources, the ruggedized watch “is aimed at athletes, hikers and others who use the device in more extreme environments.” The new watch would include extra impact resistance and protection, much like the Casio line of G-Shock watches.

Finally, MacRumors reports that Apple Maps’ speed camera data has been added for at least some locations in the Netherlands. The speed camera locator is already available to U.S., Canadian, U.K., and Irish drivers through CarPlay or an iPhone. The feature is also reported to be available in Australia, Austria, Sweden, Belgium and New Zealand, but Apple has not confirmed this.