The Most Dangerous Cars in America

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6. Escape
> Make:
Ford
> Bad ratings: Small overlap front
> Sales year-to-date: 175,669
> MSRP: $22,960

Selling more than 175,000 units year-to-date, the Ford Escape is one of the most popular vehicles in the country. It is also relatively unsafe. In 2008, Ford started selling the Escape with side curtain airbags standard in every available trim. This improved the IIHS’s safety rating for side impact accidents from the a grade of poor on some models to good. The 2015 model received received a rating of poor for head-on collisions with a small overlap. The IIHS crash tests revealed that those riding in a Ford Escape are susceptible to serious injuries to their hips and thighs in such accidents.

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7. Grand Caravan
> Make:
Dodge
> Bad ratings: Small overlap front
> Sales year-to-date: 44,442
> MSRP: $21,795

Currently on its fifth generation, the Dodge Grand Caravan remains a primary competitor in the minivan market it helped pioneer in the mid-1980s. The Grand Caravan’s fifth generation marked an improvement of the vehicle’s safety features, including improved safety ratings for moderate front overlap and side collisions. However, the vehicle performed poorly in head-on collisions with small overlap. Crash simulations revealed that severe lower body injuries are likely in such cases.

8. Journey
> Make:
Dodge
> Bad ratings: Small overlap front
> Sales year-to-date: 59,563
> MSRP: $20,695

The Dodge Journey, a small to midsize crossover, was introduced in 2009. In the model’s entire history, the car scored perfect marks in every major crash test category with the exception of the partial front impact test. In that test, the Journey received a poor rating, with injuries to the right hip, right knee, and right lower leg likely in this type of a crash. During the test, the dummy’s left lower leg was hurt by the parking brake pedal.

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9. Juke
> Make:
Nissan
> Bad ratings: Small overlap front
> Sales year-to-date: 15,994
> MSRP: $20,250

The Nissan Juke, a subcompact crossover SUV, has been a unique option for American drivers since its 2011 introduction. While the vehicle received top safety marks from the IIHS in most measures, it failed in instances of a head-on collision with a small overlap. In such cases, drivers would likely sustain injuries to their lower left leg and foot. With moderate frontal overlap however, IIHS tests revealed “a low risk of any significant injuries.”

10. Leaf
> Make:
Nissan
> Bad ratings: Small overlap front
> Sales year-to-date: 10,990
> MSRP: $21,510

Introduced in 2011, the Nissan Leaf was the first fully electric vehicle priced for the typical car buyer. The vehicle, which can travel about 75 miles on a full charge, received favourable reviews from Consumer Reports. The IIHS gave the Leaf top safety scores in all categories but one. The Leaf received a poor safety rating for head-on collisions with a small overlap. In such accidents, the IIHS found that “injuries to the left knee and left lower leg would be likely,” and that “injuries to the left thigh would be possible.” Nissan sold more than 30,000 Leafs in 2014.