Special Report

The Worst Cities for Black Americans

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately hurt black and poor people across the United States. For many Americans, it has laid bare harmful inequities entrenched in the U.S. economic system. Since February, black workers have been more likely than white workers to lose their jobs, and those that still have jobs are more likely to be employed in frontline “essential” jobs. Black Americans make up 12.5% of the U.S. population, but as of the middle of May accounted for 22.4% of COVID-19 deaths.

As states ease precautions and Americans’ fears of the virus begin to subside, cities across the nation have erupted in protest following the latest incident of police violence caught on video in the eight-minute killing of George Floyd.

For some Americans, Floyd’s death offered a glimpse into how police have treated black communities for hundreds of years. For others, it was yet another confirmation of what everyday racist policing looks like.

Race, but also location, appears to be related to the likelihood of such violent police incidents. The Minneapolis metropolitan area ranked fourth in our latest ranking of cities with the worst racial divides.

To determine the 15 worst cities for black Americans, 24/7 Wall St. ranked the nation’s metropolitan areas based on racial disparities in income, education, health, incarceration, and other socioeconomic inequalities using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Click here to see the worst cities for Black Americans.
Click here to see our full methodology.