Special Report

How COVID-19 Has Disproportionately Affected Minority Communities In Every State

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11. Hawaii
> Community w/ highest death-to-pop. ratio: No racial data available
> Share of COVID-19 infections: Data not available
> Share of COVID-19 deaths: Data not available
> County with most COVID-19 deaths: Maui County (4 per 100,000 county residents)
> Maui County population: White (30.4%); Black (0.5%); AIAN (0.1%); Asian (28.7%); NHPI (10.4%); Hispanic (11.2%)

A geographically isolated state, Hawaii has been largely spared the worst effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. As of July 13, there have been only 86 cases and 1 coronavirus related death for every 100,000 people — each the lowest rate among states. Hawaii has one of the proportionally smallest Black populations of any state. Just 1.7% of the state population identifies as Black, compared to the 12.3% share of the population nationwide. Unlike nearly every other state, the coronavirus is less likely to affect Black Americans in Hawaii. Black residents account for only 1.1% of infections in the state.

Native Hawaiians are likely facing one of the most disproportionate burdens from the state’s outbreak. While race is not included in COVID-19 fatality reporting, Native Hawaiians, who make up 9.3% of state residents, have accounted for approximately 38% of positive COVID-19 cases.

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12. Idaho
> Community w/ highest death-to-pop. ratio: Asian (1.4% of pop.)
> Asian share of COVID-19 infections: 1.7%
> Asian share of COVID-19 deaths: 2.0%
> County with most COVID-19 deaths: Nez Perce County (47 per 100,000 county residents)
> Nez Perce County population: White (87.0%); Black (0.2%); AIAN (5.7%); Asian (0.8%); NHPI (0.1%); Hispanic (3.9%)

As of July 13, there have been about six coronavirus deaths for every 100,000 people in Idaho. Across the state, there are eight counties where the concentration of COVID-19 deaths exceeds the state average — and each of them is home to larger than average shares of Native American or Hispanic or Latino populations. In Nez Perce County, where a state-leading 47 deaths per 100,000 people has been reported, 5.7% of the population identifies as Native American, about five times the statewide concentration. Several cases have been reported on the Nez Perce Reservation, and many of the deaths reported were in a single nursing home in Lewiston, the largest city in the county.

On the state level, the Asian community bears the largest burden of COVID-19 deaths of any race in Idaho. While Asian Americans constitute 1.4% of the Idaho population, they account for 2.0% of all deaths — the highest ratio of any racial identity in the state with available data.

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13. Illinois
> Community w/ highest death-to-pop. ratio: Black or African American (14.0% of pop.)
> Black share of COVID-19 infections: 22.8%
> Black share of COVID-19 deaths: 28.3%
> County with most COVID-19 deaths: Union County (111 per 100,000 county residents)
> Union County population: White (91.0%); Black (1.4%); AIAN (0.1%); Asian (0.3%); NHPI (0.0%); Hispanic (5.1%)

Illinois, the nation’s fifth most populous state, hit its highest level of daily new COVID-19 diagnoses on May 8 with 4,014 new confirmed cases. Since then, the state has brought the number down to fewer than 1,000 new infections a day. In the week ending July 13, however, cases again spiked to over 1,000 a day. Black residents have been hit hard, making up 14% of the state’s population but accounting for 28.3% of the known coronavirus deaths and 22.8% of infections.

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14. Indiana
> Community w/ highest death-to-pop. ratio: Black or African American (9.2% of pop.)
> Black share of COVID-19 infections: 20.1%
> Black share of COVID-19 deaths: 18.1%
> County with most COVID-19 deaths: Decatur County (121 per 100,000 county residents)
> Decatur County population: White (94.9%); Black (0.6%); AIAN (0.2%); Asian (1.4%); NHPI (0.0%); Hispanic (1.9%)

Home to nearly one million people, Marion County, located in the Indianapolis metro area, is the most populous county in Indiana. More than 27% of the county population are Black, about three times the statewide concentration of Black residents. As of July 13, there have been 1,282 COVID-19 infections and 73 coronavirus deaths for every 100,000 people — well above the comparable statewide concentrations of 778 infections and 38 deaths per 100,000 people. Across Indiana as a whole, Black residents account for about 20% of all COVID-19 infections and 18% of all deaths, though less than 10% of the state population are Black.

The economic and public health toll of the coronavirus is disproportionately affecting lower income households. Across Indiana, the typical Black household earns $33,342 a year, a fraction of the $57,269 the typical white household earns.

15. Iowa
> Community w/ highest death-to-pop. ratio: Black or African American (3.4% of pop.)
> Black share of COVID-19 infections: 11.1%
> Black share of COVID-19 deaths: 5.3%
> County with most COVID-19 deaths: Tama County (169 per 100,000 county residents)
> Tama County population: White (81.5%); Black (0.8%); AIAN (7.1%); Asian (0.3%); NHPI (0.0%); Hispanic (9.2%)

Iowa is one of the least racially diverse states in the country. Of the state’s 3.1 million residents, 86.1% are white, compared to 61.1% of Americans nationwide who do. Though the state has had a higher concentration of COVID-19 infections than the U.S. as a whole — 1,125 per 100,000 people compared to 1,016 per 100,000 — it has had fewer fatalities. As of July 13, there have been 24 COVID-19 deaths for every 100,000 people in Iowa, compared to 39 per 100,000 nationwide.

Each of the counties in Iowa hit hardest by coronavirus deaths are home to relatively large Hispanic and Latino populations. In five of the seven Iowa counties where the COVID-19 death rate more than doubles the statewide average, the share of the population identifying as Hispanic or Latino far exceeds the 5.9% share of Iowa residents who do.