The States With the Most McDonald’s

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10. Kentucky
> McDonald’s locations per 100,000 residents: 5.94
> Obesity rate: 33.2% (5th highest)
> Pct. consuming vegetables less than daily: 25.2% (15h highest)
> Median household income: $43,399 (5th lowest)

There are nearly six McDonald’s restaurants per 100,000 Kentucky residents, the 10th-highest ratio in the country. As in other states with relatively high numbers of McDonald’s stores, Kentucky is also home to more than 100 Wendy’s locations, or 3.5 stores per 100,000 residents — the 4th highest rate nationwide. Fast food tends to be far more affordable than other restaurant fare, and residents in low-income states are perhaps more likely to visit a McDonald’s. A median household in Kentucky earned $43,399 in 2013, less than all but a handful of other states. Residents were also not as educated as the average American — less than 23% of adults had at least a bachelor’s degree, one of the lowest educational attainment rates in the country. A high prevalence of fast food restaurants is often representative of a poor food landscape, in which many people struggle to access healthy foods. Nearly 46% of Kentucky residents reported consuming fruits less than once daily, the seventh-highest percentage nationwide. Roughly one-third of Kentucky residents were obese, one of the highest obesity rates in the country.

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9. Indiana
> McDonald’s locations per 100,000 residents: 5.97
> Obesity rate: 31.8% (9th highest)
> Pct. consuming vegetables less than daily: 27.3% (4th highest)
> Median household income: $47,529 (17th lowest)

Indiana has about 270 Burger Kings locations, or 4.1 per 100,000 residents. While this is the highest concentration of Burger Kings in the country, there are nearly 400 McDonald’s restaurants or about 6 per 100,000 residents, in the state. Subways are even more common, with more than 10 per 100,000 residents, making Subway more common in Indiana than in all but three other states. Without examining individual consumption habits, it is difficult to tie a high concentration of McDonald’s outlets to negative health outcomes. However, as in nearly every other state with the most McDonald’s restaurants, Indiana’s obesity rate of nearly 32% was among the highest nationwide. Also, 27.3% of residents reported consuming vegetables less than once daily, the fourth-highest percentage in the country.

8. Tennessee
> McDonald’s locations per 100,000 residents: 6.05
> Obesity rate: 33.7% (4th highest)
> Pct. consuming vegetables less than daily: 25.4% (14th highest)
> Median household income: $44,297 (9th lowest)

Tennessee’s roughly 6.5 million residents have access to numerous Burger King, Wendy’s and Taco Bell restaurants, each of which has more than 200 locations in the state. McDonald’s has nearly twice as many locations, 393, or 6.05 per 100,000 Tennesseans, the eighth-largest concentration in the country. As in other areas with relatively high numbers of McDonald’s stores, and particularly those in the Southern United States, Tennessee residents had low incomes and reported relatively poor health outcomes. A typical household in the state earned $44,297, one of the lowest median annual household incomes in the nation. And nearly 34% of residents were obese, the fourth-highest obesity rate in the country.