Special Report

The Worst Animated Disney Movies of All Time

Disney wrote the book on animated movies, beginning with the world’s first full length animated feature film, “Snow White,” in 1937. The movie brightened a dark, Grimm Brothers’ folk tale with iconic elements that came to evince a distinct Disney style: casts of memorable cartoon characters, cute forest animals with wagging butts, catchy tunes, and happy, happy endings.

Frequently, Disney scripts also adopted some of the noirish features of the folk tradition, often with deceased parents, truly frightening evil doers, and lost innocence, but, for the most part, they were meant to send movie goers home whistling a happy tune.

As the Disney style evolved, particularly after the addition of Pixar in 2006, the stories became ever more original, adopting contemporary themes, ethnic and female heroes, and a winking charm for the adults sitting in on the fun. Here’s how Pixar films have done at the box office.

Many of the movies, such as “The Lion King” and “Toy Story”, became instant classics, the former spinning off an immensely popular Broadway show, and the latter finding renewed magic, and immense profit, in sequels.

The formula has worked most of the time to great success, as the Disney studios animated traditional fairy tales and classic children’s books over the course of generations, while introducing stories with a more relevant, modern vibe, and raking in dozens of Academy Awards.

These movies are iconic, popular, and memorable — except for the ones that aren’t. It’s easy to think of Disney animation as one long success story, but, in fact, the studio produced some clunkers. There are many Disney movies we watch with our kids again and again, but here are the ones that you probably won’t sit through a second time.
Here are the animated flops from other studios.

Click here for the worst Disney movies of all time

Methodology

To identify the best animated Disney movies of all time, 24/7 Tempo created an index composed of each film’s rating on IMDb, an online movie database owned by Amazon, as well as its Audience Score and Tomatometer score on Rotten Tomatoes, an online movie and TV review aggregator. Data on worldwide ticket sales came from The Numbers, an online movie database owned by consulting firm Nash Information Services, and is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index and historic movie ticket prices.