Special Report

The Best (and Worst) Paying Cities for Women

4. Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA
> Women’s pay as a pct. of men’s:
71.0%
> Median earnings for men: $45,081
> Median earnings for women: $32,017

In community and social service occupations, as well as in education jobs, where women made up the majority of the Youngstown area workforces, the median earnings of female workers were greater than or close to equal the male earnings. In architecture and engineering, on the other hand, median earnings for women workers were half of the median earnings of males, nearly the worst occupational wage gap in the field among large metro areas. While women in the area had slightly better educational attainment rates than men, all area residents were far less likely than most Americans to have attained at least a bachelor’s degree as of 2013.

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3. Dayton, OH
> Women’s pay as a pct. of men’s:
70.6%
> Median earnings for men: $49,729
> Median earnings for women: $35,097

Unlike other large metro areas with the widest gender pay gaps, female managers working in Dayton earned closer to what men did than women working such jobs nationwide. And for area women working in computer and mathematical jobs, median earnings actually exceeded male earnings. However, female workers in other occupations were not so fortunate. In health diagnosing and practitioner occupations, where women made up more than three-quarters of the workforce in Dayton, median earnings for women were equal to 37.2% of male median earnings, nearly the lowest such pay share in large metro areas.

2. Ogden-Clearfield, UT
> Women’s pay as a pct. of men’s:
68.6%
> Median earnings for men: $51,689
> Median earnings for women: $35,445

Women in the Ogden metro area were paid especially unfairly in art-related fields and protective service occupations, such as firefighters. Median earnings among women in the two occupations were 55.9% and 42.8% of male earnings, respectively, some of the worst occupational pay gaps in large metro areas. Women in the area had more than 80% of health care support jobs and had median earnings of $25,148. While this was lower than earnings nationally for the same jobs, women working in these fields earned considerably more than men in similar jobs. This was exceptional, however, as area women fared worse than women nationally in nearly every other occupation in the metro. The pay gap among workers in building and ground cleaning and maintenance occupations, for example, was worse than in every other large metro area, with women’s median earnings equal to just 36.3% of male earnings in 2013.

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1. Provo-Orem, UT
> Women’s pay as a pct. of men’s:
59.8%
> Median earnings for men: $52,170
> Median earnings for women: $31,209

The median earnings of working women in the Provo metro area were $31,209 in 2013, less than 60% of median earnings for men, by far the worst pay gap among large metro areas. Unlike other metro areas with large gender pay gaps, men had a far higher educational attainment rate than women, with 41.6% of men holding at least a bachelor’s degree, versus less than 34% of women. Women who had better education still were not guaranteed fair pay. For example, women in legal occupations, which generally require relatively high levels of education, earned roughly one-third of what men did in the same jobs, nearly the worst such pay gap in large metro areas. Median earnings of women working in education fields were equal to less than 62% of median male earnings, the worst pay gap among the 100 largest metro areas. The majority of Utah residents are members of the Mormon Church. Some women’s rights groups have observed that the disparate treatment of men and women in Utah metro areas may be due in part to views held by the Church.

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