The Most Expensive Town in Each State

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11. Urban Honolulu, Hawaii
> City cost of living:
122.9
> State cost of living: 117.2
> City median rent paid: $1,535
> City median household income: $73,388

Due in large part to costly transportation expenses, goods and services in Hawaii cost more than they do in any other state. Perhaps as a result, Honolulu, where the cost of living is nearly 23% higher than the national average, is the most expensive area in both the state and the entire country. As in most expensive areas, incomes are also high. The typical household in Honolulu earns $73,388 annually, well above the state’s income figure of $68,020, which itself is the fourth highest compared to all states.

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12. Boise City, Idaho
> City cost of living:
94.7
> State cost of living: 93.6
> City median rent paid: $799
> City median household income: $49,583

Boise City citizens pay slightly more for goods and services than residents statewide. Boise City is the only metropolitan area in Idaho where the cost of living is greater than the cost of living across the state. While expenses are marginally higher in Boise City, residents tend to earn more in order to afford these costs. Boise City’s per capita income was $34,818, about $600 more than income statewide. As is the case in many of the most expensive cities, residents have higher educational levels. Nearly 31% of Boise City residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Statewide, only 26.2% of residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

13. Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois
> City cost of living:
106.6
> State cost of living: 100.6
> City median rent paid: $959
> City median household income: $60,564

The Chicago-Naperville-Elgin area is the most expensive metropolitan area in Illinois. In fact, it is the only metro area with a higher price parity than the state average. While goods and services in Illinois are, on average, 0.6% more expensive than they are nationwide, the cost of living in the Chicago metro area is 6.6% more expensive than the country as a whole. None of the other nine metropolitan areas in Illinois has a higher cost of living than the national average.

14. Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana
> City cost of living:
93.9
> State cost of living: 91.1
> City median rent paid: $789
> City median household income: $51,087

The nearly 2 million people who call the Indianapolis area home pay more for goods and services than the residents of the state’s 11 other metropolitan areas. Housing costs in both the state and the city are cheaper than the country as a whole. While state residents pay just 75.8% of the average rent cost nationwide, people in the Indianapolis metro area pay 86.1% of the national average rent. Similarly, the median home value in the area is just shy of $140,000, almost $20,000 more than Indiana’s median home value of $122,200.

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15. Iowa City, Iowa
> City cost of living:
95.9
> State cost of living: 89.5
> City median rent paid: $799
> City median household income: $52,220

In Iowa City, the most expensive metropolitan area in Iowa, goods and services cost about 4% less on average than they do nationwide. While the cost of living in Iowa remained the same from the year before, the relative price of goods and services in Iowa City increased slightly. Despite having a higher cost of living than the state’s, Iowa City residents earn less money on average than all state residents. Per capita income in Iowa City is about $1,600 less than statewide income per person.