The Most Expensive Town in Each State

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36. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
> City cost of living:
92.3
> State cost of living: 89.9
> City median rent paid: $762
> City median household income: $50,136

Though Oklahoma City is the most expensive metropolitan area in Oklahoma, there is little disparity in cost of living across the state. The state’s other two metro areas, Tulsa and Lawton, have a regional price parity of 91.1 and 91.5, respectively — only slightly lower than Oklahoma City’s 92.3. Compared with the rest of the state, Oklahoma City not only has a higher cost of living, but also a higher per capita income. The average person in Oklahoma City earned just over $44,500 annually, while the average state resident took home about $42,700.

37. Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon
> City cost of living:
100.5
> State cost of living: 98.8
> City median rent paid: $969
> City median household income: $59,168

Though part of the Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro metropolitan area extends into Washington, the largest share of the area’s 2.3 million residents live in Portland. Of the eight metropolitan areas in the state, Portland is the only city with a higher cost of living than the national average. Furthermore, the cost of living in the other seven cities is less than the average statewide cost of living. Rent in Portland was more expensive than in any other metro area in the state, costing 9.2% more than the national average.

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38. Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, Pennsylvania
> City cost of living:
109.0
> State cost of living: 98.7
> City median rent paid: $997
> City median household income: $60,482

Though the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington metropolitan area spans three states, the largest share resides in and around Philadelphia. The cost of living in the area is 9% higher than the average cost of living nationwide, while the cost of living in Pennsylvania is actually 1.3% less than the average cost nationwide. State College was the only other metropolitan area out of the 18 in the state with a higher cost of living than the nationwide average. The median home value in the Philadelphia metro area was also significantly higher than the corresponding statewide cost, at $233,600 versus $164,200 respectively.

39. Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island
> City cost of living:
99.8
> State cost of living: 98.7
> City median rent paid: $885
> City median household income: $55,055

Providence-Warwick is the most expensive metropolitan area in Rhode Island by default as it is technically the only census-designed metropolitan area in the state. Though the relative price parity declined from 100.5 in the previous year to the current rate of 99.8, Providence is still more expensive than the state as a whole by about 1%. Despite a higher cost of living, per capita income is slightly lower in Providence than the state as a whole. The average metro resident earns about $43,155 annually, over $700 less than the $43,905 the average Rhode Islander takes home.

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40. Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina
> City cost of living:
95.7
> State cost of living: 90.7
> City median rent paid: $952
> City median household income: $51,771

Of the eight metropolitan areas in South Carolina, the Charleston area is the most expensive. The average cost of goods and services is 5.5% higher in Charleston than it is across the state. Renters in particular pay significantly more in South Carolina’s most expensive city than they do across the state. While the average renter in Charleston paid 94.6% of the average renter’s expenses across the country, the average renter in South Carolina paid just 76.3% of what the average renter paid nationwide.