How Obamacare Increased Insurance Coverage in Every State

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26. Texas
> Ppt change in uninsured rate, 2012-2015: -4.9
> Expanded Medicaid?:
no
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2012: 22.5% (the highest)
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2015: 17.6% (2nd highest)

In 2012, before the state’s Health Insurance Marketplace open enrollment period began, 5,762,358 Texas residents, or 22.5% of the population, did not have health insurance. At the time, this was the largest share of uninsured residents of any state.

Since then, the percentage of Texans without health insurance has decreased by 4.9 percentage points. Still, a relatively high 17.6% of Texas’ population remains uninsured, but the state no longer has the lowest health insurance coverage rate, beating only Alaska. Texas has not expanded Medicaid. If the state decides to do so, an estimated 1.2 million low-income Texas residents would gain health insurance, the largest projected increase in the nation.

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27. Michigan
> Ppt change in uninsured rate, 2012-2015: -5.0
> Expanded Medicaid?:
yes
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2012: 11.4% (17th lowest)
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2015: 6.4% (18th lowest)

More than 1.1 million Michigan residents did not have health insurance in 2012, or 11.4% of the state’s population. As of March 2015, since the Affordable Care Act was implemented, that percentage had dropped by 5 percentage points, a slightly smaller drop than the national decline of 5.7 percentage points. Nevertheless, the state’s underinsured rate, at 6.4%, was nearly 3 percentage points below the rate of uninsured Americans. The low uninsured rate may be due to Michigan’s decision to expand Medicaid to more than 300,000 residents.

28. Tennessee
> Ppt change in uninsured rate, 2012-2015: -5.1
> Expanded Medicaid?:
no
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2012: 13.9% (23rd highest)
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2015: 8.8% (22nd highest)

Tennessee deferred to the federally managed health care exchange website and did not take advantage of the federal incentives to expand Medicaid coverage. According to the federal government, an additional 234,000 state residents would gain coverage if Medicaid is expanded in Tennessee, lowering the uninsured rate to 5.2%. Still, many more people are covered today in Tennessee because of the ACA.

In 2012, before the implementation of Obamacare, 13.9% of the population did not have health insurance. Since then, the uninsured rate has fallen by 5.1 percentage points to 8.8%, just lower than the nationwide uninsured rate of 9.1%. The average monthly premium for a 40-year-old, nonsmoking man in the state in 2015 was just $200, fifth lowest of any state.

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29. South Carolina
> Ppt change in uninsured rate, 2012-2015: -5.2
> Expanded Medicaid?:
no
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2012: 16.8% (13th highest)
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2015: 11.6% (11th highest)

South Carolina’s rate of uninsured residents dropped from 16.8% in 2012 — 13th highest at the time — to 11.6% this year, the 11th highest. The state has not opted to expand Medicaid coverage to the state’s nearly 200,000 individuals with incomes less than 138% of the federal poverty level. If these South Carolina residents were to become eligible for Medicaid, the uninsured rate would fall to an estimated 7.4%. South Carolina residents pay higher-than-average insurance premiums, with the typical 40-year-old male spending $268 per month.

30. Ohio
> Ppt change in uninsured rate, 2012-2015: -5.4
> Expanded Medicaid?:
yes
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2012: 11.5% (19th lowest)
> Pct. population without health insurance, 2015: 6.1% (14th lowest)

An estimated 11.5% of Ohio residents did not have health insurance in 2012. By March this year, the percentage had fallen by 5.4 percentage points, inline with the nationwide drop. Ohio was among 31 other states to expand Medicaid under the ACA. As a result of the expansion, 587,000 individuals received health insurance.

Like most other states, Ohio residents must visit healthcare.gov to receive health insurance. Despite the lack of a state-specific health insurance exchange, Ohio’s Department of Insurance website provides useful links and information for state residents curious about Obamacare.