The Brands That Have Lost The Most Value In The Last Decade

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Many of the 100 most valuable brands from 2001, lost much of their value between then and 2009. Many of these brand declines are predictable, given the fate of their sectors.

Car companies such as Ford fared poorly. So did major pharmaceutical firms including Merck.  Some brands that were aging in 2001 have been so badly beaten down that they are no longer on the Interbrand 100, the benchmark that 24/7 Wall St. used to make its calculations. Interbrand is one of the biggest brand value measurement and consultancy services in the world.

These are the  24/7 Wall St. Ten Brands That Have Lost The Most Value This Decade:


1. Ford
2001: $30 billion (8th most valuable brand of 2001)
2009: $7 billion (49th most valuable brand of 2009)

Ford was part of the still-successful Big Three in 2001. The company’s stock price was nearly $26 then compared with less than $12 today. Ford has suffered for a long time as consumers’ opinions of its quality worsened. Japanese car companies gained market share throught the last decade. And in some cases they moved to the top of customer satisfaction surveys. Ford also suffered from the negative publicity that the GM and Chrysler bankruptcies brought to the domestic industry.


2. Compaq
2001: $12 billion (24th most valuable brand of 2001)
2009: No longer on Interbrand’s Top 100

Compaq was arguably the most well-respected PC company in the United States in 2001. The firm was early into the sub-$1,000 PC market and entered the enterprise computer market when it bought Digital Equipment. Compaq was purchased in 2001 by Hewlett-Packard in one of the most acrimonious M&A deals of the last decade. Compaq became a sub-brand within the PC company and is now simply part of a large line of products.

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3. Kodak
2001: $10 billion (27th most valuable brand of 2001)
2009: No longer on Interbrand’s Top 100

Eastman Kodak owned the digital camera market at the beginning of this decade. It also had a presence in enterprise printing. The company lost ground to Japanese competitors and to Hewlett-Packard in the printer segment.  Nikon, Panasonic and Canon are now among the leaders in the digital camera industry. Kodak traded for $47 in 2001. It has dropped more than 90% since then.


4. Citibank
2001: $19 billion (13th most valuable brand of 2001)
2009: $10 billion (36th most valuable brand of 2009)

Citi has suffered from a number of damaging events, most of them over the last three years. The financial firm nearly became insolvent due to the credit crisis. It fired one CEO and his replacement was on a number of “worst CEO” lists, including ours. In 2001, Citi’s share price was nearly $60 and was still above $45 before the financial markets collapsed. Citi was rescued by the government, and for a time was nearly a ward of the state. Its shares still trade at less than $4 after moving below a dollar in 2009.