Special Report

The 25 Newest Guns To Enter Standard US Military Use

Stocktrek Images / Stocktrek Images via Getty Images

Napoleon Bonaparte is considered one of the greatest military generals of all time. When he gained power in the 18th century, the French army was in serious disrepair. With a wave of new technology, and the tactics those new technologies allowed, Napoleon was able to take Europe. The story still provides lessons to the generals of today, particularly about the advantages of technological innovation. As guns or weapons in general continue to get updated over the years, there is a new tactic to be used or a new advantage to be gained. (Also see, the bombs and missiles used by the U.S. military.)

The U.S. military embodies this principle as it is perhaps the most technologically-advanced military on the planet. In part this is due to building on the weapons of the past and innovating further. Some of the weapons still used today have been in active service since World War II, and their newest iterations are just as deadly if not more. (Here are nine foreign made firearms used every day by the U.S. military.)

To determine the most recent small arms to enter U.S. military service, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed a range of sources, including military handbooks, government press releases, and firearms publications pertaining to small arms and light weapons currently used by the U.S. military. Small arms are ranked according to what year they entered the service, based on information from Military Factory, an online database of military vehicles, aircraft, arms and more used by militaries across the world. Data on the type of weapon, caliber, and maximum range also came from Military Factory.

The weapons on the list range from sniper rifles, shotguns, rocket launchers, and more. Some of the manufacturers are household names in gun culture, while others might not be as well known, but each plays a critical role in the success of the U.S. military.

Here is a look at the most recent arms to enter U.S. military service:

Source: Stocktrek Images / Stocktrek Images via Getty Images

25. M136 Light Anti-Armor Weapon (AT4)
> Year entered service: 1987
> Type: Man-portable, disposable anti-armor rocket launcher
> Caliber: 84mm
> Maximum range: 985 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Air Force

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Source: 39955793@N07 / Flickr

24. M252, 81 Mortar
> Year entered service: 1987
> Type: Medium weight extended range mortar
> Caliber: 81mm
> Maximum range: 18,618 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Marine Corps

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

23. Remington M24 SWS (Sniper Weapon System)
> Year entered service: 1987
> Type: Bolt-action sniper rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 2,624 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Air Force, USSOCOM

22. M120, 120mm Mortar
> Year entered service: 1991
> Type: Towed heavy field mortar
> Caliber: 120mm
> Maximum range: 23,750 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Marine Corps

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Source: zim286 / iStock via Getty Images

21. Colt M4
> Year entered service: 1994
> Type: Assault carbine
> Caliber: 5.56×45 mm
> Maximum range: 1,640 ft
> Military branches used: All branches

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

20. Raytheon & Lockheed Martin FGM-148 Javelin
> Year entered service: 1996
> Type: Anti-tank guided missile launcher
> Caliber: 127mm explosive
> Maximum range: 8,202 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Marines

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

19. GA MSSR (Marine Scout Sniper Rifle)
> Year entered service: 1996
> Type: Semi-automatic sniper rifle / designated marksman rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 3,610 ft
> Military branches used: Army

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

18. Benelli M4 Super 90 (M1014 JSCS)
> Year entered service: 1999
> Type: Semi-automatic combat shotgun
> Caliber: 12 gauge
> Maximum range: 164 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Marine Corps

17. Heckler & Koch HK MP7
> Year entered service: 2001
> Type: Submachine gun / machine pistol
> Caliber: 4.6×30mm HK
> Maximum range: 656 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Navy, Coast Guard

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

16. M26 (MASS)
> Year entered service: 2003
> Type: Modular accessory shotgun system
> Caliber: 12 gauge
> Maximum range: 135 ft
> Military branches used: Army

Source: usairforce / Flickr

15. Mk14 Mod 0 EBR (Enhanced Battle Rifle)
> Year entered service: 2004
> Type: Battle rifle / designated marksman rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 1,500 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Navy, Coast Guard

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

14. MK 20 Mod 0 Sniper Support Rifle
> Year entered service: 2004
> Type: Bolt-action sniper rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 1,980 ft
> Military branches used: Army

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

13. Heckler & Koch HK 416
> Year entered service: 2005
> Type: Assault rifle / tactical carbine weapon
> Caliber: 5.56×45 mm
> Maximum range: 985 ft
> Military branches used: Marine Corps, Army Delta Force, Naval Special Warfare Development Group (SEAL Team 6)

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

12. Heckler & Koch HK 417
> Year entered service: 2006
> Type: Battle rifle / designated marksman rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 2,625 ft
> Military branches used: Joint Special Operations Command, Army, and Navy

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

11. General Dynamics Mk 47 Striker AGL (Mk 47 Mod 0)
> Year entered service: 2006
> Type: 40mm automatic grenade launcher
> Caliber: 40 mm grenades
> Maximum range: 5,600 ft
> Military branches used: SOCOM

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

10. M110 SASS (Semi-Automatic Sniper System)
> Year entered service: 2007
> Type: Designated marksman rifle / sniper rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 2,624 ft
> Military branches used: Amy, Marines, SOCOM

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Source: Stocktrek Images / Stocktrek Images via Getty Images

9. Barrett M107
> Year entered service: 2008
> Type: Anti-material / anti-personnel sniper rifle
> Caliber: .50 BMG
> Maximum range: 1,850 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard,USSOCOM

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

8. M39 Enhanced Marksman Rifle (EMR)
> Year entered service: 2008
> Type: Designated marksman rifle / sniper rifle
> Caliber: 7.62x51mm
> Maximum range: 2,550 ft
> Military branches used: Marines

7. Fabrique Nationale FN SCAR (Mk 16 / Mk 17)
> Year entered service: 2009
> Type: Modular automatic assault rifle
> Caliber: 5.56×45 mm and 7.62×51mm
> Maximum range: 1,980 ft
> Military branches used: United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM)

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

6. Brugger & Thomet APC9 (series)
> Year entered service: 2011
> Type: Modular personal defense weapon
> Caliber: 9 mm
> Maximum range: 330 ft
> Military branches used: Army, Air Force

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

5. Heckler & Koch HK M27 IAR (Infantry Automatic Rifle)
> Year entered service: 2011
> Type: Squad support / designated marksman weapon
> Caliber: 5.56×45 mm
> Maximum range: 1,800 ft
> Military branches used: Marine Corps

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4. Remington M2010 ESR (Enhanced Sniper Rifle)
> Year entered service: 2011
> Type: Bolt-action sniper rifle
> Caliber: .300 Win Mag
> Maximum range: 3,935 ft
> Military branches used: N/A

Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

3. Remington MSR (Modular Sniper Rifle)
> Year entered service: 2013
> Type: Remington MSR (modular sniper rifle)
> Caliber: 7.62×51 mm, .300 Norma Magnum, and .338 Norma Magnum
> Maximum range: 4,920 ft
> Military branches used: Army, SOCOM

2. SIG-Sauer P320
> Year entered service: 2014
> Type: Semi-automatic pistol
> Caliber: 9 mm, .357 SIG, and .40 S&W
> Maximum range: 165 ft
> Military branches used: All branches

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Source: Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

1. Accuracy International Mk 13 (SOCOM)
> Year entered service: 2017
> Type: Bolt-action sniper rifle
> Caliber: .300 Win Mag
> Maximum range: 3,940 ft
> Military branches used: Navy, Marines

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