Countries That Spend the Most on Health Care

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10. France
> Total expenditure on health per capita: $3,978
> Expenditure as % of GDP: 11.8% (3rd most)
> Annual growth of total health expenditure: +2.7% (18th most)
> Life expectancy: 81.5 years (8th highest)

Health care in France ends up costing about $4,000 per person each year, which is 11.8% of its GDP — the third-highest percentage among OECD nations. The government and insurance providers pay nearly the entire bill as the French’s out-of-pocket expense is rather small. Residents only pay $290 per person a year, or 7.3% of the total health care expenses — the third-least among all 34 OECD nations.

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9. Germany
> Total expenditure on health per capita: $4,218
> Expenditure as % of GDP: 11.6% (4th most)
> Annual growth of total health expenditure: +4% (15th most)
> Life expectancy: 80.3 years (18th highest)

Much like France, Germany’s expenditure on health care as a percentage of GDP is high among developed nations. The country’s spending habits result in many health benefits that exceed those in other countries. For instance, Germany has among the highest doctors and hospital beds per person in the OECD. The country also has the sixth-highest number of doctor consultations per capita on an annual basis at 8.2, and the fifth-longest average length of hospital stay at 7.5 days.

8. Austria
> Total expenditure on health per capita: $4,298
> Expenditure as % of GDP: 11% (8th most)
> Annual growth of total health expenditure: +2.2%
> Life expectancy: 80.4 years (16th highest)

In Austria, nearly $4,300 is spent per person on each year health care. This is the equivalent of 11% of the country’s GDP. Some 77 percent of the country’s expenses are covered by the public health care system, and so out-of-pocket expenses come to less than $600 per year, nearly $400 less than what the average American spends.

7. Denmark
> Total expenditure on health per capita: $4,348
> Expenditure as % of GDP: 11.5% (6th most)
> Annual growth of total health expenditure: +6% (11th most)
> Life expectancy: 79.0 years (25th highest)

Each year health care costs Denmark $4,348 per capita — the seventh most among developed countries. This large amount is largely covered by the government. In Denmark, 85% of total health expenditure is public, making it the least-privatized health care system in the OECD. While the country has average doctor consultations per capita, it has relatively low rates of hospital beds per capita and the lowest average length of hospital stays.

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6. Canada
> Total expenditure on health per capita: $4,478
> Expenditure as % of GDP: 11.3% (7th most)
> Annual growth of total health expenditure: +7.4% (7th most)
> Life expectancy: 80.7 years (tied for 12th highest)

Canada’s health care system costs $4,500 per person each year, the sixth-most among the 34 OECD countries. Between 2008 and 2009, costs increased 7.4%, the seventh-most among developed nations. One of the biggest expenses for the country are hospital stays. The average length of an acute care hospital visit is 7.7 days. Drugs are extremely expensive in the country. Each year, costs of pharmaceuticals come to $743 per person, the second most in the developed world.