Special Report

Worst Selling Cars of the Decade

Michael B. Sauter

Marketing and selling a new car can be a risk for auto manufacturers. A new entry in the car market requires time and money to design, market, and manufacture it. If the new model finds success, it can be a coup for car companies– and establishing a new and popular brand can pay off for years.

Most of the top-selling models in the United States sell over 100,000 units each year. The Mazda CX-5, which first went on sale in the U.S. in 2012, sold over 150,000 units in the U.S. in 2018 and will come close to that figure this year. But completely new car models often fail — either because of poor reviews or a changing market — and usually after a few years they are discontinued. These are the cars Americans don’t want to buy.

As the decade comes to a close, 24/7 Wall St. looked back on some of the models introduced in the 2010s that failed to gain traction in the U.S. auto market. Using historical auto sales data from car sales data website goodcarbadcar.net, 24/7 Wall St. identified the worst selling new cars of the decade.

None of the vehicles on this list sold more than 50,000 units in the United States in total during the decade, even with at least two years of sales, the majority failed to break 10,000 units sold in a single year. Some of these brands are still being sold today, while others have already been discontinued.

These cars are sold by a variety of manufacturers and under a number of brands. Some are outliers for otherwise relatively highly-successful brands. On the other hand, there are also several Fiats and Infinitis on this list, brands that have been struggling as a whole in recent years.

As car sales for a new model disappoint, manufacturers will often offer discounts to try and move their excess inventories. A number of the cars on this list have gotten cheaper over the years. This is every car brand’s cheapest model.

Click here to see the worst selling cars of the decade.
Click here to see our methodology.