Special Report

What a Super Bowl Commercial Cost the Year You Were Born

It is safe to say that no championship game in the over five decades of the event will be played in more unusual circumstances than Super Bowl LV. The event has never had fewer than 60,000 in attendance, but this year, due to COVID-19-related safety measures, there will be 25,000 fans in attendance, with another 30,000 cardboard cutouts to fill the empty seats in Tampa’s Raymond James Stadium. This is certainly a disappointment for the Tampa fans who were hoping to be among those cheering on a Super Bowl contender in the team’s home stadium for the first time ever.

The Super Bowl is perennially the most watched television event in the United States. Last year’s event drew in 102.1 million viewers through TV or online streaming. It was the 11th most watched television event in the United States — behind nine other Super Bowls and the M*A*S*H series finale. And with people confined at home, it is safe to say the Super Bowl this year will once again be appointment viewing for a large segment of the American Population.

With such a large viewership, it’s not just the NFL’s biggest day — Major corporations shell out millions of dollars for just 30 seconds of air time, guaranteed to be watched by tens of millions of Americans and many millions more across the globe. The last few events reportedly each commanded at least $5 million for a 30 second spot, according to Ad Age, a media company that reports on advertising.

24/7 Wall St. reviewed historical costs of a 30-second commercial spot in all 52 Super Bowls to determine the cost of a Super Bowl commercial the year you were born. Data came from Ad Age.

Click here to see what a Super Bowl commercial cost the year you were born.