Paul Ausick

Paul Ausick is a senior editor at 24/7 Wall St., where he has also served as a senior writer and energy editor. His stories on subjects as diverse as company logos and China's strategy for securing natural resources have been published or cited by The New York Times, The New Yorker, USA Today, MSN, Barron's, Forbes, CBS News, CNBC, NBC News, Time, MarketWatch and The Washington Post, among many other publications.

He spent 15 years as a technical and marketing writer in Silicon Valley, working on hardware and software products. For 10 years, he worked for hard drive maker Seagate Technology, at the time one of the 10 largest firms in the Valley. He directed and helped code Seagate's first website and led the early development of video marketing stories to support sales efforts for the company's products.

Paul began writing about energy companies in 2004, specializing in oil and gas pipeline master limited partnerships. From there, he broadened his scope to include exploration and production companies, refiners and global energy markets. While he still covers these sectors, he has also written in depth about the housing market, the auto industry, technology, the aerospace industry and financial markets. Paul has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Chicago and now lives in Montana.

Lastest Stories by Paul Ausick

With President-elect Joe Biden's coming speech on a program to rebuild America's infrastructure, here are four large construction firms that are poised to thrive.
Semiconductor manufacturing giant TSMC reported better-than-expected quarterly and annual results Thursday morning. But the real winners could be the companies that provide services to TSMC.
Early investors in electric vehicle maker Canoo are setting up to cash in some 186 million shares and warrants. The company came public late last month in a reverse merger with a blank-check company.
Three of the country's biggest banks and one of its three-largest regional banks get the new earnings season off to a big start on Friday morning. Here's our look at what to expect.
Rising crude oil prices have put a dent in short sellers' enthusiasm for oil and gas stocks.
As share prices for alt energy stocks continue to soar, short sellers are not shy about betting against the shares.
Counter to the typical pattern for a recession, fewer CEOs left their jobs last year. Uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the nation's economic policy may have made companies pause before...
Short sellers appear dubious about gold, with most expecting seeing prices for the yellow metal improving.
With share prices of electric vehicle makers soaring, it should be no surprise that short sellers are pouncing on the stocks as well.
Chinese EV maker Nio has revealed the payout for its $1.5 billion debt offering. The five-year $650 million tranched pays no interest but carries a conversion premium of 50%.
Several independent oil and gas producers have recovered large portions of their 2020 full-year losses in just the first seven days of trading in 2021. Can the run continue?
Chinese EV maker Nio plans to raise $1.5 billion in the company's second offering of senior unsecured notes. This time, buyers can expect little if any interest payments, but a big payoff in a few...
Small business owners' outlook for the new year soured in December, falling below the 47-year average as the surging pandemic and a new administration prepares to take office in Washington.
One bet that paid off in 2020 was the one on online gambling. With resort and casino attendance suffering from the pandemic, gamblers wanting some action were able to find some at home.
This past weekend, Chinese EV maker introduced its ET7 sedan, its challenge to Tesla's Model S sedan. The new EV uses a powerful new chip from Nvidia.