The Richest Cities Where No One Wants to Move

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10. Omaha-Council Bluffs, Neb.-Iowa
> Metro movers ratio: 2.04
> Median home price: $138,000
> Home value decline from peak: -2.8%
> Unemployment: 4.7%
> Forecast change in home price through 3Q 2012: +1.5%

The Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan region is relatively stable and economically healthy. It is surprising then that relatively few people want to move to the area compared to the number of people looking to leave. For every person — from outside the region — inquiring about real estate within the region, there are two people within the region searching for homes elsewhere. With home prices in the area falling only 2.8% since their peak, home buyers have little incentive to search in the Omaha region. However, Fiserv-Case Shiller projects home prices to rise 1.5% between third quarter of 2011 and the third quarter of 2012, which is in the top third of increases among major metro regions.

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9. Camden, N.J.
> Metro movers ratio: 2.11
> Median home price: $180,000
> Home value decline from peak: -24.7%
> Unemployment: 9.5%
> Forecast change in home price through 3Q 2012: -3.3%

From its peak at the end of 2007, home prices have declined by nearly 25% in the metro region of Camden. The region borders Pennsylvania and is directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. While it is not in the top tier for expensive properties, it is still well above average, with a median home value of $180,000 as of the third quarter of last year. Prices are expected to drop 3.3% between the third quarter of 2011 and the third quarter of 2012. However, they will then increase 4.6% per year through 2016.

8. Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Wash.
> Metro movers ratio: 2.11
> Median home price: $350,000
> Home value decline from peak: -29.2%
> Unemployment: 8.2%
> Forecast change in home price through 3Q 2012: +0.1%

The November unemployment rate in Seattle was 8.2%, below the national average of 8.7%. Home prices in the area declined substantially — nearly 30% from their peak — during the recession, but are still quite high. The median home value in the Seattle region is $350,000, the 15th highest rate in the country. According to Fiserv-Case Shiller, home values are projected to stay steady over the next year, but between the third quarter of 2011 and the third quarter of 2012, prices are expected to jump nearly 10% in the Seattle area.

7. Baltimore-Towson, Md.
> Metro movers ratio: 2.17
> Median home price: $258,000
> Home value decline from peak: -22.3
> Unemployment: 7.2%
> Forecast change in home price through 3Q 2012: -0.8%

While some areas of the city of Baltimore continue to suffer from unemployment and slow economic growth, the metropolitan area as a whole is actually doing relatively well. The metro region’s unemployment rate is just 7.2%, well below the national average of 8.7%. And median family income is $81,900, the 25th highest in the country. Meanwhile, median home price in the region is $285,000, the 28th highest in the country. Fiserv-Case Shiller projects that home prices will decline slightly through the third quarter of next year, but then will increase at an annual rate of nearly 5% through 2016, keeping home prices high for quite some time.

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6. New Haven-Milford, Conn.
> Metro movers ratio: 2.21
> Median home price: $220,000
> Home value decline from peak: -21.1%
> Unemployment: 9.2%
> Forecast change in home price through 3Q 2012: -1.6%

The unemployment rate in the New Haven-Milford metropolitan region of Connecticut was 9.2% in November — among the highest in the country. Yet median family income in the third quarter of last year also was relatively high at $74,800. Median home value at the same time was $220,000. According to Fiserv-Case Shiller, families spend nearly a quarter of their monthly income on mortgage payments per month. Home prices in the area are projected to drop 1.6% through the third quarter of 2012, but are projected to increase at a rate of 5.3% per year through 2016.