The Worst-Paying Cities for Women

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5. Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Fla.
> Women’s pay as pct. of men’s: 69.8%
> Median income for men: $45,582
> Median income for women: $31,820

The median earnings for women in the Palm Bay metropolitan area in 2011 who worked full time was less than 70% of that for men. The pay gap in the Palm Bay area actually bucks the trend in the state as a whole. In Florida, the median income for women was 83.8% that of men’s, the sixth-smallest gap of all states. Nearly 3.7% of the population works in health support, a higher percentage than all but one other city. The pay gap in that field is very large. Women earned just over 55% the pay of men in 2011. One bright spot was in computer and mathematical occupations. Women earned a median income of more than $67,000, or approximately $3,900 more than the median wage for men.

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4. Baton Rouge, La.
> Women’s pay as pct. of men’s: 69.3%
> Median income for men: $51,037
> Median income for women: $35,362

The median income for a woman working full time in Baton Rouge was nearly $16,000 less than the median income for a man. About 7.6% of the population works in the construction and extraction industry, the second-highest percentage of all metro areas measured. Many of these people are employed in chemical extraction. Chemical companies have a significant presence in Baton Rouge, with companies such as Dow Chemical, BASF and ExxonMobil’s chemical unit among the largest employers in the region. In the construction and extraction industry, women earned just 52.4% of what men earned in 2011. Other fields where the pay gap between men and women in Baton Rouge was large include production, where the median income of women in 2011 was just 40.6% of the median income of men, and transportation, where women’s earnings were just 42.8% that of men’s.

3. Lancaster, Penn.
> Women’s pay as pct. of men’s: 68.6%
> Median income for men: $47,318
> Median income for women: $32,446

Lancaster is an industrial town. About 11.6% of all full-time, year-round jobs in the region are in the manufacturing industry, the third-highest percentage of the top 100 largest metropolitan areas. Major manufacturers in the region include Armstrong World Industries and R.R. Donnelly & Sons. The median income for women in the manufacturing industry was just 64.3% that of men’s in 2011. The gap was even worse in other fields. In the transportation industry, the median income of women was just 43% that of men’s in 2011, one of the widest pay gaps among the largest metropolitan areas in that field.

2. Ogden-Clearfield, Utah
> Women’s pay as pct. of men’s: 65.2%
> Median income for men: $52,184
> Median income for women: $34,018

Ogden-Clearfield was one of just two metro areas where the median income for women was less than two-thirds of that of men’s. The median income for women was less than half the median income of men in many occupations. In the legal profession, women working full-time earned just 26.3% of what men earned, the biggest pay discrepancy of all metro areas in that field. Women working full time in personal care and service occupations earned just 40.3% of the pay that men did, again the largest pay discrepancy of all metro areas. Other jobs where women’s median income was less than half that of men’s include sales, health diagnosis and treatment, and transportation occupations.

1. Provo-Orem, Utah
> Women’s pay as pct. of men’s: 61.6%
> Median income for men: $51,692
> Median income for women: $31,846

No metropolitan area had a greater pay disparity between men and women than Provo, where the median income in 2011 for men working full time was nearly $20,000 more than the median income for women. Women who worked in personal care and service occupations earned a median of just $18,590, or 44.3% of the earnings of their male counterparts. The pay gap was still vast even in higher-wage positions. Women working in business and financial operations earned just 57.8% of what men earned in 2011, one of the largest pay gaps in that field.

Also Read: The Best-Paying Cities for Women