How Many People Are Left From the Year You Were Born

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The U.S. fertility rate tumbled to its lowest level ever in 2017, with 60.2 births per 1,000 women between the ages of 15 and 44, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. The total fertility rate has been below replacement level since 1971.

Even so, the nation’s population continues to grow, climbing to about 327.9 million as of June 5, according to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. The U.S. population has been rising because of immigration and longer life expectancy.

24/7 Wall St. has determined how many people born each year since 1933 are alive today. Not surprisingly, the share of people alive today generally increases as years go by. We used data collected from government agencies such as the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis to create the list.

Because of greater access to health care, which has improved dramatically over the last century, life expectancy has increased significantly. The average person born in 1930 lived to 59.7 years. By 2012, the average life expectancy had increased to 78.8 years, though that number has slightly declined in recent years.

Click here to see how many people from the year you were born are alive.

To determine how many people are left from the year you were born, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed estimates of the native population by age from the U.S. Census Bureau. These estimates adjust for both naturalized citizens as well as native-born Americans living outside the United States. The share of people born each year since 1933 alive in 2018 was calculated by comparing these U.S. Census Bureau population estimates to the number of births each year from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Vital Statistics of the United States report series. Total U.S. population figures in each year are from the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

This is how many people from the year you were born are alive.