Special Report

50 Best Sci-Fi Movies Of All Time

Source: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

35. Gravity (2013)
> IMDb user rating: 7.7/10 (791,410 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes audience score: 80% (303,360 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer score: 96% (356 reviews)
> Directed by: Alfonso Cuarón

Alfonso Cuarón’s action-packed sci-fi thriller stars Sandra Bullock as an astronaut who’s stranded in space after the space shuttle she’s in is destroyed. The film follows her attempts to return safely to earth, and features stunningly realistic visual effects of the barren wasteland of the cosmos. It’s a wild and fast-paced ride, and was met with near-universal critical acclaim. It was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, and picked up seven, including Best Director and Best Visual Effects.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

34. A Quiet Place (2018)
> IMDb user rating: 7.5/10 (480,270 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes audience score: 83% (24,285 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer score: 96% (387 reviews)
> Directed by: John Krasinski

The perfect sci-fi/horror hybrid, “A Quiet Place” follows a husband (director John Krasinski), wife (Emily Blunt), and their two children (Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe) as they try to survive in a post-apocalyptic world ruled by blind aliens who’ve killed most of the population. To survive, they must remain completely silent, and communicate using sign language. A critical smash, it cemented Krasinski’s reputation as not just a great actor, but also an up-and-coming director of note.

Source: Courtsey of Twentieth Century Fox

33. Planet of the Apes (1968)
> IMDb user rating: 8/10 (172,247 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes audience score: 87% (119,124 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer score: 86% (59 reviews)
> Directed by: Franklin J. Schaffner

One of the most iconic films of all time, “Planet of the Apes” stars Charlton Heston as an astronaut whose crew crash-lands on a mysterious planet in the distant future. They soon discover that it’s ruled by apes that can speak and are just as smart as humans, and that all the humans who live there are mute. Its twist ending is just about perfect, and it was so successful that it spawned four sequels, TV shows, a 2001 Tim Burton remake, and a reboot series.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

32. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
> IMDb user rating: 7.6/10 (192,000 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes audience score: 85% (142,184 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer score: 94% (64 reviews)
> Directed by: Steven Spielberg

“Close Encounters” stars Richard Dreyfuss as Roy Neary, an Indiana blue-collar worker whose life is completely changed after he encounters a UFO. It was nominated for nine Academy Awards and won two (for cinematography and sound effects editing), and is easily one of Steven Spielberg’s best and most thought-provoking films.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

31. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982)
> IMDb user rating: 7.7/10 (116,510 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes audience score: 90% (85,576 votes)
> Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer score: 88% (64 reviews)
> Directed by: Nicholas Meyer

KHAAAAAANNN!!!! This second entry in the canon of “Star Trek” films stars William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, and the rest of the cast of the original series, but Ricardo Montalban steals the show with an over-the-top, scenery-chewing, chest-baring performance as Khan Noonien Singh, a genetically engineered tyrant who’s hell-bent on revenge against the Enterprise crew. The first film to contain a scene created completely with computer graphics, it’s regarded as the best of the first batch of “Star Trek” films and helped renew interest in the franchise.