States Where Alzheimer’s Is Soaring

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45. Wisconsin
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 18.2%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 12.2% (11th highest)
> Population 65+: 15.6% (23rd highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 78.3% (14th highest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,149 (8th lowest)

In Wisconsin, 1,876 people died from Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, or 32.6 for every 100,000 people, a slightly higher than average mortality rate. States with more elderly adults tend to have more residents with Alzheimer’s Dementia, and states that currently have relatively more cases of the disease tend to have lower projected increases. Wisconsin fits this pattern as 12.2% of people 65 and older have Alzheimer’s, the 11th highest such percentage.

There are only 1.8 caregivers for every Alzheimer’s patient in Wisconsin, the lowest ratio of any state.

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44. Missouri
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 18.2%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.6% (21st highest)
> Population 65+: 15.6% (22nd highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 73.7% (14th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,480 (13th lowest)

In Missouri, Medicaid costs associated with caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease are predicted to rise 30.7% from 2017 to 2025, one of the lowest projected increases of all states. The number of elderly people with the disease will increase by 18.2% over the same period, the seventh slowest increase among states.

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43. Indiana
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 18.2%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 11.4% (23rd lowest)
> Population 65+: 14.6% (14th lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 73.9% (16th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $17,659 (2nd lowest)

The number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease in Indiana will rise by 18.2% to 130,000 from 2017 to 2025. Alzheimer’s-related Medicaid costs for state residents age 65 and older are projected to reach $913 million this year. In the next eight years, that figure is expected to increase by 30.9% — much lower than the national projected increase of 37.1% — to nearly $1.2 billion.

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42. Illinois
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 18.2%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 12.0% (14th highest)
> Population 65+: 14.2% (12th lowest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 71.8% (11th lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $27,638 (8th highest)

In Illinois, Medicaid costs to care for those with Alzheimer’s disease are forecast to rise 36.4% from 2017 to 2025 — slightly less than average. Every state will need to invest more resources in caring for Alzheimer’s patients in coming years. While Illinois is no exception, the state started addressing the disease many years ago. Illinois’ legislative package known as the “Alzheimer’s Initiative,” which is designed to advance research and treatment, was approved already back in 1985.

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41. Pennsylvania
> Increase in Alzheimer’s, 2017-2025: 18.5%
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s: 12.4% (10th highest)
> Population 65+: 17.0% (6th highest)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. in good health: 75.7% (22nd lowest)
> Avg. retirement income: $21,263 (10th lowest)

The number of 65 and over people in Pennsylvania, who currently comprise 17% of the population, is expected to grow by less than 20% by 2025, nearly the slowest projected elderly population growth of all states.

Medicaid costs for caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease in Pennsylvania are estimated to be $3.23 billion in 2017. Alzheimer’s-related Medicaid spending is projected to increase by only 20.7% in the next eight years, the smallest projected spending growth of any state. Lower Medicaid costs for elderly populations are generally expected in states with lower projected increases in Alzheimer’s cases.