The New York Times Company

NYSE: NYT
$41.45
-$0.11 (-0.3%)
Closing price September 24, 2020
At more and more papers, the newsroom is gone entirely. That may further undermine the future of newspapers, even if it saves what has become very precious money.
The trust in each of these 10 brands is very high. The companies will still be around in 100 years, although they may have to change their business models somewhat.
Thursday's top analyst upgrades and downgrades included Apple, AT&T, Avis Budget, Baidu, Baker Hughes, Biogen, Chipotle Mexican Grill, Kinder Morgan, Netflix, Shopify and Ulta Beauty.
Shares of The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) are flat over the last month. In the meantime, the overall market is down 21%. Other newspaper stocks have done much worse. The Times has one thing...
One would think the wider newspaper industry could take a page from The New York Times playbook to salvage what is left of it. Unfortunately, it can't.
If there is any lesson from the New York Times results, it is that the industry's problems will not just persist but will worsen.
The top analyst upgrades, downgrades and initiations seen on Friday included Activision Blizzard, BioMarin Pharmaceuticals, Ciena, Delta Air Lines, GlaxoSmithKline, Procter & Gamble, Regeneron...
The top analyst upgrades, downgrades and initiations seen on Tuesday included AbbVie, AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Crocs, HCA, Kellogg, Kosmos Energy, Mylan, Pandora Media and Square.
Plans for a huge retail merger deal are dropped, the tariff war between the United States and China escalates, the SEC examines by Elon Musk comments about taking Tesla private, and other important...
New York Times released better-than-expected first-quarter financial results before the markets opened on Thursday.
A JPMorgan analyst has upgraded shares of the New York Times and lifted the price target, citing increased demand for "reliable" news outlets.
A growing body of evidence suggests that newspaper revenue dropped as much as 10% in the first quarter, an intractable problem that continues to vex publishers.
There is no question the health of the newspaper industry has gotten much worse over the past 20 years as online news has crippled what has been, until recently, a print business.
Newsprint prices may cripple already challenged newspaper company bottom lines. As more papers fold or are forced to cut editorial staff, the industry cannot handle another major financial headwind.
New tariffs levied against newsprint imported from Canada to the U.S. will cost already struggling newspapers millions of dollars. Survival is not guaranteed.