Poorest Town in Every State

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1. Selma, Alabama
> Town median household income: $22,414
> State median household income: $43,623
> Town poverty rate: 41.9%
> Town population: 19,987

Selma is the poorest town in one of the poorest states. The typical Selma household earns just $22,414 a year, well below the $43,623 median income statewide. Like many towns on this list, poverty is relatively common in Selma. Some 41.9% of residents live below the poverty line, more than double Alabama’s 18.8% poverty rate.

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2. Ketchikan, Alaska
> Town median household income: $53,111
> State median household income: $72,515
> Town poverty rate: 16.6%
> Town population: 8,197

Alaska is one of the wealthiest states in the country, and even residents of Ketchikan — the state’s poorest town — are better off financially than many Americans. The median household income in Ketchikan is $53,111 a year, roughly in line with the $53,889 national median income. One factor helping all Alaskans stay financially afloat is the Alaska Permanent Fund. While the dedicated fund — which pays all qualified state residents a share of annual state oil revenues — has decreased in the wake of falling petroleum prices, the dividend was worth $1,022 in 2016.

Source: Thinkstock

3. New Kingman-Butler, Arizona
> Town median household income: $27,675
> State median household income: $50,255
> Town poverty rate: 30.8%
> Town population: 11,859

The median household income in New Kingman-Butler — Arizona’s poorest town — is only $27,675 a year, slightly more than half the statewide median income. In addition to incomes, property values in the town are well below what is typical across Arizona. The typical home in New Kingman-Butler is worth just $50,800, less than one third of the statewide median home value of $167,500.

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4. Camden, Arkansas
> Town median household income: $25,256
> State median household income: $41,371
> Town poverty rate: 31.4%
> Town population: 11,683

Camden, Arkansas is the poorest town in one of the poorest states. Some 31.4% of Camden’s population lives below the poverty line, more than twice the 15.5% national poverty rate. High paying jobs often require higher educational levels, and only 16.3% of Camden’s adult residents have a bachelor’s degree. In comparison, 21.1% of Arkansas adults have a four-year college degree.

5. San Joaquin, California
> Town median household income: $24,437
> State median household income: $61,818
> Town poverty rate: 54.2%
> Town population: 4,008

In the central California town of San Joaquin, the typical household earns only $24,437 a year, and over half of the population lives in poverty. In comparison, 16.3% of Californians live in poverty, and the statewide median household income is $61,818 a year.