America’s Busiest Border Towns

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10. Nogales, Ariz.
> Truck traffic: 287,091
> Total value of trade: $22.1 billion
> Most traded commodity: Vehicles and vehicle parts
> Value of most traded commodity: $5.9 billion

This busy port separates Nogales, Ariz., from Nogales, Mexico. Nogales is currently undergoing an expansion project as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The project, which is expected to be completed in 2014, will have primary and secondary inspection areas for vehicles, a pedestrian-processing center and a new canine kennel, among other additions. The most traded commodity at the port in 2011 was vehicles and vehicle parts, with just under $6 billion worth going through the border in 2011.

9. Calexico East, Calif.
> Truck traffic: 312,973
> Total value of trade: $11.8 billion
> Most traded commodity: Electrical machinery and equipment
> Value of most traded commodity:$3.4 billion

Calexico, located at the southern tip of California, is often mentioned in relation to the rampant drug trade in the area, with busts and cases of drug-related violence often making headlines. The region is one of the top locations for cocaine seizures. When it comes to legal goods, by far the most traded product in 2011 was electrical machinery, with more than $3.3 billion worth of those goods shipped. A ready lane was opened at the Calexico East Port of Entry in 2011, which allowed for shorter wait times to cross the border.

Also Read: The States Doling Out the Best (and Worst) Benefits

8. Blaine, Wash.
> Truck traffic: 338,570
> Total value of trade: $18.9 billion
> Most traded commodity: Nuclear reactors and machinery
> Value of most traded commodity: $2.4 billion

Nearly 340,000 trucks crossed this border between Blaine, Wash., and Surrey, British Columbia, in 2011. Approximately 235,000 of those trucks were carrying merchandise. About $18.9 billion worth of goods passed through the port in 2011. The most traded commodity through Blaine was nuclear reactors, boilers, machinery and mechanical appliances, with about $2.4 billion worth shipped in or out of the country through this port in 2011.

7. Hidalgo, Texas
> Truck traffic: 453,235
> Total value of trade: $24.5 billion
> Most traded commodity: Electrical machinery and equipment
> Value of most traded commodity: $9.2 billion

More fruits and nuts, in dollar value, went through Hidalgo’s port in 2011 than any other port in the U.S., with total trade value exceeding $1 billion. But like many other ports, the most traded commodity was electrical machinery, with $9.2 billion worth of these goods exchanged. In addition to freight trucks, Hidalgo’s port of entry is among the busiest in terms of personal vehicles, with nearly 4.9 million vehicles traveling through the port each year.

6. Port Huron, Mich.
> Truck traffic: 673,707
> Total value of trade: $83.0 billion
> Most traded commodity: Vehicles and vehicle parts
> Value of most traded commodity: $16.2 billion

Port Huron connects the eastern part of Michigan with Ontario, Canada. Nearly 674,000 trucks entered the country using the Port Huron port, with 556,000 of those vehicles actually carrying goods across the border. Roughly $3.2 billion worth of organic chemicals were traded through the port in 2011, more than in any other port. More than $2.2 billion worth of paper products went through the barrier, also more than in any other port. But the most traded product, in terms of value, was vehicles at $16.2 billion.