Nine Retailers Closing the Most Stores

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5. Office Depot

Office Depot merged with rival OfficeMax in November. Since the merger, the company has been cutting jobs at its combined headquarters. The next stage in integrating the two retailers, the company has stated, will be to cut store count. CEO Roland Smith admitted the company’s merger was difficult for many workers, telling the Orlando Sun-Sentinel that “it is difficult to focus on business when your personal future is uncertain.” The company had 1,912 retail stores at the end of its latest fiscal year, including 823 OfficeMax stores. Since the merger, the company has closed 15 of its Office Depot stores and seven OfficeMax locations.

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6. RadioShack

During the Super Bowl, RadioShack attempted to poke fun at itself, running an ad touting its store remodelling that playfully referenced the store’s reputation as a throwback to the 1980s. But a reinvention alone may not save the electronics retailer — its previous attempt at rebranding itself as “The Shack” never caught on. The retailer recently announced it would close 1,100 out of its more-than 5,000 stores. The company has deemed these closings as critical to its cash-management and turnaround plans, which it hopes would help reverse recent poor results. Both the company’s top and bottom lines have declined considerably in recent years, and its operating cash flow is also down from years past. The fourth quarter of last year, which coincides with the holiday season, was especially troubling. Sales declined 19% at stores open at least a year because of lower foot traffic and weak performance in mobile sales.

7. Sears Holdings

Sears has been heading downhill since 2005, when Wall Street billionaire Edward Lampert merged Sears Roebuck & Co. with Kmart in a deal worth $11 billion. Since 2010, the company has closed roughly 300 stores. One of the few surges in the company’s share price came at the end of January, after it announced the closing of its flagship store in Chicago in April. Shedding its assets has been a major part of the company’s business for years. The company has not only dumped stores, but entire businesses, including Orchard Supplies Hardware Stores, Sears Hometown & Outlet Stores, Lands End, and a part of its stake in Sears Canada. Cowen analyst John Kernan recently noted that he expected Sears Holdings to close an additional 500 stores going-forward.

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8. Staples

Staples recently announced plans to close 225 stores, or roughly 12% of its total count, by the end of 2015. The closures reflect both the company’s struggling sales totals, as well as its shift away from brick-and-mortar business to online retail. In its recent earnings release, the company said almost half of its sales come from online orders, and store closures reflect an opportunity to save money while improving the company’s bottom line. This is not the first time headwinds have lead the company to close stores. In 2012, Staples shut 60 stores, mostly in Europe, as part of its plans to cut costs. The company referred to its shift to online sales.

9. Toys “R” Us

A Toys “R” Us was taken private by a consortium of companies in 2005. Nearly a decade later, disagreements among the company’s ownership and a high debt burden have weighed down the retailer. In all, Toys “R” Us spent nearly three years trying to time an IPO, before backtracking last May. In early March of this year, industry sources told The Record’s NorthJersey.com that the company would soon close some 100 stores. Whether or not the company decides to close stores, major changes may be needed. Real estate giant Vornado, one of the three co-owners of Toys “R” Us, recently announced a more than $240 million writedown on its investment in the company. Among the reasons it gave were the company’s 2013 holiday sales results, “and our inability to forecast a recovery in the near term.” Toys “R” Us has struggled to keep up with online competition as well. A December report from Bloomberg indicated it was easier to find the holidays’ hottest toys on Amazon.com than through Toys “R” Us’ website.

Correction: An earlier version of this article stated that Barnes & Noble had closed 26 since it announced plans to close 200 stores over ten years. In fact, it closed 14 stores since the announcement.