The 10 States That Use the Most Energy

Print Email

10. Indiana
>Consumption per capita: 442.3 million Btu
>Residential consumption per capita: 89.2 million Btu (8th highest)
>Industrial consumption per capita: 198.2 million Btu (7th highest)
>Residential price per kWh: 9.56 cents (17th least)
>Population: 6,516,922 (15th most)

Indiana ranks tenth for its consumption of energy per capita at 442.3 million Btu. That is the equivalent of almost 80 barrels of oil a person per year. Indiana also ranked fourth in consumption of energy for industrial purposes. The state is a huge consumer of coal for its energy, with slightly more than 50% of the state’s consumption coming from coal. Indiana produced the 20th-most energy among all states.

9. Kentucky
>Consumption per capita: 454.7 million Btu
>Residential consumption per capita: 93.3 million Btu (3rd highest)
>Industrial consumption per capita: 190.2 million Btu (9th highest)
>Residential price per kWh: 8.57 cents (4th least)
>Population: 4,369,356 (25th least)

Kentucky is one of four states on this list that produces more energy than it consumes. In fact, Kentucky was the sixth-largest producer of energy in the country. Coal accounted for 93% of all energy production in the state in 2009. And since energy production can be quite energy intensive industry, it is no surprise that the Bluegrass State came consumed the fifth-most energy in absolute terms. Kentucky enjoyed one of the lowest costs of energy in the country. The average price among all sectors in the state was 6.73 cents per kWh. The national average among all sectors was 9.83 cents. The state ranked third in residential consumption of energy per capita.

Also Read: States Losing the Most Jobs to China

8. Nebraska
>Consumption per capita: 461.1 million Btu
>Residential consumption per capita: 89.8 million Btu (7th highest)
>Industrial consumption per capita: 191.2 million Btu (8th highest)
>Residential price per kWh: 8.94 cents (10th least)
>Population: 1,842,641 (13th least)

Nebraska consumed about twice the amount of energy the state produced in 2010. Nebraska ranked fifth in the country for its commercial consumption of energy on a per capita basis and seventh for its residential consumption of energy on a per capita basis. At 7.52 cents per kWh, the Cornhusker State paid the ninth-lowest price for energy on average across the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. Although the state was a net consumer of energy, it did rank second in the country in ethanol production behind Iowa. Nebraska has the potential to be a much larger producer of energy due to oil in the Niobrara shale and the state’s good conditions for wind energy.

7. South Dakota
>Consumption per capita: 464.9 million Btu
>Residential consumption per capita: 86.6 million Btu (12th highest)
>Industrial consumption per capita: 181.8 million Btu (10th highest)
>Residential price per kWh: 8.97 cents (11th least)
>Population: 824,082 (5th least)

In 2011, 77% of the electricity generated in South Dakota was wind and hydroelectric power. South Dakota has some of the best wind resources in the country. The state has some of the lowest energy prices in the country. South Dakotans on average, across all sectors, paid 7.82 cents a kWh compared to 9.83 cents nationally. For transportation energy consumption per capita, South Dakota ranked sixth in the country. And for commercial energy consumption per capita, the state ranked seventh.

6. Texas
>Consumption per capita: 466.1 million Btu
>Residential consumption per capita: 65.8 million Btu (13th lowest)
>Industrial consumption per capita: 225.4 million Btu (6th highest)
>Residential price per kWh: 11.60 cents (18th most)
>Population: 25,674,681 (2nd most)

On an absolute basis, Texas produced and consumed more energy than any other state. In fact, it consumed nearly 12% of the energy America consumed. It also was responsible for more than 15% of America’s total energy production. Texas led the country in crude oil, natural gas and wind energy production. Texas ranked just 38th in residential energy consumption per capita. For transportation and industrial per capita usage, Texas ranked ninth and sixth, respectively.