Special Report

Every State’s Rules for Reopening and Social Distancing

Massachusetts
> Confirmed COVID-19 cases as of June 4: 1,472 per 100,000 people — 3rd highest (total: 101,592)
> COVID-19 related deaths as of June 4: 104 per 100,000 people — 4th highest (total: 7,152)
> Tests as of June 4: 8,898 per 100,000 people — 6th highest (total: 614,133)
> Date of first confirmed case: 2/1/2020
> Est. peak date: 4/7/2020 (est. 20,125 active infections)
> Population: 6,902,149

Gov. Charlie Baker issued an executive order on June 1 that detailed the businesses that can open in the state’s reopening plan. Retailers will transition to browsing and in-store transactions with restrictions from curbside pickup and delivery-only at the start of Phase 2, which started on June 1. Occupancy will be limited to eight people per 1,000 square feet of indoor space, or 40% of occupancy.

Organized sports programs will be conducted under provisions such as limiting contact sports to no-contact drills and practices and separating participants into groups of 10 or fewer.

Restaurants are allowed to provide outdoor dining service at the start of Phase 2 and may be allowed indoor dining depending on local health data.

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Michigan
> Confirmed COVID-19 cases as of June 4: 581 per 100,000 people — 13th highest (total: 58,035)
> COVID-19 related deaths as of June 4: 56 per 100,000 people — 7th highest (total: 5,570)
> Tests as of June 4: 6,073 per 100,000 people — 14th highest (total: 607,085)
> Date of first confirmed case: 3/10/2020
> Est. peak date: 3/27/2020 (est. 15,179 active infections)
> Population: 9,995,915

The stay-at-home order was extended in Michigan until at least June 12. The order also extends the closure of public venues like theaters, gyms, and casinos. Michigan allowed retailers and auto dealerships to reopen on May 26. Effective May 29, the state lifted the requirement that health care providers postpone some nonessential medical, dental, and veterinary procedures.

Retailers are allowed to open beginning June 4 and restaurants after June 8, but with capacity limits. Swimming pools, libraries, museums and day camps for children can open after June 8 as well. Groups of up to 100 people have been allowed to gather outdoors while social distancing since June 1. Indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people at most. Office work that cannot be performed remotely can resume, as well as in-home services such as house cleaning.

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Minnesota
> Confirmed COVID-19 cases as of June 4: 461 per 100,000 people — 20th highest (total: 25,870)
> COVID-19 related deaths as of June 4: 19 per 100,000 people — 18th highest (total: 1,086)
> Tests as of June 4: 4,736 per 100,000 people — 24th lowest (total: 265,718)
> Date of first confirmed case: 3/6/2020
> Est. peak date: 4/20/2020 (est. 2,847 active infections)
> Population: 5,611,179

The stay-at-home order expired on May 17. Some recreational activities, including golfing, boating, fishing, hunting, and hiking have been allowed to resume since April 18. Industrial jobs that are not customer-facing can resume if social distancing and sanitary procedures are in place. Employees who can work from home should continue to do so. Retail stores, malls, and other nonessential street businesses can reopen at 50% occupancy and if they follow physical distancing guidelines.

Starting May 27, places of worship have been allowed to open at 25% capacity. Gatherings in outdoor settings are limited to a maximum of 250 people. Salons, and barbershops can now open with restrictions. Restaurants and bars can offer outdoor service with restrictions.

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Mississippi
> Confirmed COVID-19 cases as of June 4: 547 per 100,000 people — 15th highest (total: 16,322)
> COVID-19 related deaths as of June 4: 26 per 100,000 people — 14th highest (total: 782)
> Tests as of June 4: 6,172 per 100,000 people — 13th highest (total: 184,335)
> Date of first confirmed case: 3/11/2020
> Est. peak date: 4/30/2020 (est. 1,871 active infections)
> Population: 2,986,530

Mississippi’s safer-at-home order ended June 1 and has been replaced by a safe return order, which is effective until June 15. Social gatherings must comply with social distancing requirements, with a limit of 50 people indoors and no more than 100 people outdoors. Gatherings where people cannot socially distance have limits of 20 people indoors and up to 50 people outside.

Health care procedures can return as before, but hospitals have to set aside at least 25% of capacity for COVID-19 patients. School buildings will also be able to open for summer programs. All businesses and nonprofits can open in line with health guidance, but employees are encouraged to keep working from home. Bars that do not serve food are allowed to reopen. Restaurants and bars can now have live music performances, with customers and musicians maintaining at least a 12-foot distance. Indoor places of amusement such as bowling alleys and playgrounds can open at 50% capacity.

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Missouri
> Confirmed COVID-19 cases as of June 4: 225 per 100,000 people — 11th lowest (total: 13,767)
> COVID-19 related deaths as of June 4: 13 per 100,000 people — 25th highest (total: 786)
> Tests as of June 4: 3,446 per 100,000 people — 14th lowest (total: 211,118)
> Date of first confirmed case: 3/7/2020
> Est. peak date: 4/14/2020 (est. 1,757 active infections)
> Population: 6,126,452

Missouri’s stay at home order ended May 4. Gov. Mike Parson said on May 28 that he was extending the first phase of his reopening plan through June 15. Phase 1 requires social distancing of 6 feet. Some businesses also are required to put limits on indoor occupancy.

Phase 2 will allow the maximum number of people gathering in one place to increase to 50 people from 10. Also in Phase 2, businesses such as restaurants, places of worship, gyms, and salons may boost operations to 50% capacity as long as social distancing is followed.

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