Special Report

Every State’s Rules for Reopening Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic

 
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South Dakota > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 728 per 100,000 people — 14th highest (total: 6,419) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 10 per 100,000 people — 16th lowest (total: 84) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 75,077 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 6.1% — 16th smallest increase (from 6,050 to 6,419) > Est. peak date: 4/21/2020 (est. 172 active infections) > Population: 882,235

The state never issued a statewide stay-at-home order, but it did institute some restrictions on gatherings and businesses. An order that required state residents to observe social distancing and CDC-recommended hygiene practices expired on May 31, but the state of emergency has been extended until December 30.

Businesses are now allowed to reopen if the surrounding area has reported a downward trend in cases for two weeks. Employees can now be called back to the office, though administrative leave is allowed for those who cannot come in and cannot work remotely.

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Tennessee > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 550 per 100,000 people — 24th highest (total: 37,235) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 8 per 100,000 people — 12th lowest (total: 556) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 718,038 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 15.8% — 16th biggest increase (from 32,143 to 37,235) > Est. peak date: 10/1/2020 (est. 2,396 active infections) > Population: 6,770,010

The stay-at-home order expired on April 30. A safer-at-home order was in effect until May 29. Many businesses have been allowed to open in the meanwhile. Restaurants can offer in-person but limited-capacity dining. Noncontact sports, like baseball, golf, or tennis, were allowed to resume on May 22, as was higher education.

Groups of up to 50 people can gather outside for social and recreational purposes if they practice social distancing. Visitation at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities resumed with restrictions on June 15.

Shelby County, which includes Memphis and is the largest county in the state, has plans to return to phase 1 (from the current phase 2) of reopening after a spike in daily new coronavirus cases.

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Texas > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 439 per 100,000 people — 16th lowest (total: 125,921) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 8 per 100,000 people — 10th lowest (total: 2,249) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 1,630,258 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 30.7% — 5th biggest increase (from 96,335 to 125,921) > Est. peak date: 10/1/2020 (est. 12,459 active infections) > Population: 28,701,845

The stay-at-home order expired on April 30. The state is now in phase 3 of reopening. Most businesses previously operating at 25% capacity can expand to 50%. Bars can increase their capacity to 50% as long as customers stay seated. Restaurants can now expand their occupancy to 75%.

All air travel restrictions, including mandatory quarantines for out-of-state travelers, have been lifted. Zoos and water parks are allowed to reopen with limited capacity. Amusement parks and carnivals in counties with more than 1,000 confirmed positive cases can open at 50% capacity.

As of June 25, all plans for further reopening have been halted due to a recent increase in new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. Just like before restrictions started to be lifted, elective surgeries are banned to preserve bed space for coronavirus patients.

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Utah > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 594 per 100,000 people — 22nd highest (total: 18,784) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 5 per 100,000 people — 8th lowest (total: 163) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 304,738 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 22.4% — 8th biggest increase (from 15,344 to 18,784) > Est. peak date: 10/1/2020 (est. 1,860 active infections) > Population: 3,161,105

The state never issued a statewide stay-at-home order. The stay safe, stay home directive expired on May 1. In-restaurant dining, gyms, and salons can now open. Gatherings of up to 20 people are allowed. Malls and national parks can reopen under tight restrictions. People are still encouraged to avoid nonessential travel. College campuses may be open for in-person classes with increased cleaning and hygiene regimen.

Most of the state is still in the yellow (or low-risk) phase of reopening. In it, there are no economic activities that are categorically prohibited if people practice social distancing and proper hygiene.

A reopening plan, called Utah Leads Together Volume 4, lays the foundation for economic recovery and focuses specifically on the next 100, 250, and 500 days. The plan emphasizes connecting unemployed individuals with available jobs, distributing assistance, upskilling workers, and investing in infrastructure projects that will help economic growth.

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Vermont > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 190 per 100,000 people — 6th lowest (total: 1,191) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 9 per 100,000 people — 13th lowest (total: 56) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 60,709 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 4.8% — 12th smallest increase (from 1,130 to 1,184) > Est. peak date: 3/14/2020 (est. 137 active infections) > Population: 626,299

The stay-at-home order expired on May 15. As of June 17, Vermont residents aged 65 and older are no longer required to stay at home. Retail and lodging businesses have reopened. Hair salons and barbershops can reopen but by appointment and with limits on occupancy. Transactions must be cashless and touchless, and owners must keep a customer log in case contact tracing is needed later.

Travel restrictions have been loosened. Out-of-state visitors can visit Vermont, but they have to complete a 14-day quarantine or a 7-day quarantine if they present a negative test result taken in their home state or in a Vermont lodging.

After June 26, events can have up to 75 people indoors and up to 150 outdoors. Arts, culture and entertainment venues, as well as restaurants, can expand capacity to 50% or one person per 100 square feet.