Special Report

Every State’s Rules for Reopening Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic

 
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Oklahoma > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 292 per 100,000 people — 10th lowest (total: 11,510) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 9 per 100,000 people — 15th lowest (total: 372) > Total tests administered as of June 25: N/A > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 29.3% — 6th biggest increase (from 8,904 to 11,510) > Est. peak date: 3/26/2020 (est. 865 active infections) > Population: 3,943,079

The state never issued a statewide stay-at-home order except for older people and those who have certain preexisting conditions. Restrictions on salons, barbers, and pet groomers have been lifted. Restaurant dining, movie theaters, gyms, houses of worship, and sporting venues have been allowed to reopen since May 1 with certain restrictions, including adhering to strict social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Phase 3 of reopening started on June 1. Businesses can now resume staffing at their work sites, but social distancing guidelines must be followed. Businesses that were operating by appointment only can now start accepting walk-ins. Summer camps can open in line with safety guidelines. Limited visitation to hospitals may resume. Visitation at nursing homes and long-term care facilities can now resume in a phased approach.

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Oregon > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 178 per 100,000 people — 5th lowest (total: 7,444) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 5 per 100,000 people — 5th lowest (total: 195) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 213,749 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 19.7% — 13th biggest increase (from 6,218 to 7,444) > Est. peak date: 10/1/2020 (est. 3,616 active infections) > Population: 4,190,713

A stay-at-home order is in effect until further notice. Counties can begin lifting some restrictions when they meet certain requirements and must stay in phase 1 of the reopening for at least three weeks. Most counties are in phase 2. In phase 2, gatherings are limited to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors, and restaurants and bars can extend their curfews to midnight. Movie theaters and large venues can expand their occupancy to up to 250 people. Employees may begin a limited return to indoor workplaces. However, working from home is still recommended.

Statewide, zoos, gardens and museums can now open in a limited manner, and professional and collegiate sports teams can resume training with added safety precautions. The state has paused all further reopening efforts until further notice due to a surge in new COVID-19 cases.

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Pennsylvania > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 650 per 100,000 people — 19th highest (total: 83,191) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 51 per 100,000 people — 11th highest (total: 6,518) > Total tests administered as of June 25: N/A > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 4.2% — 11th smallest increase (from 79,818 to 83,191) > Est. peak date: 4/12/2020 (est. 12,638 active infections) > Population: 12,807,060

The stay-at-home order expired on June 4 for all counties, though some less-affected areas in the state reopened on May 29. Social distancing and wearing masks are required when outdoors. Working remotely is strongly encouraged, and large recreational gatherings are limited to a maximum of 250 people. Businesses can now offer outdoor activities such as mountain biking, miniature golf, motor sports, rock climbing, and tennis, provided they implement safety and social distancing protocols.

Some counties now allow outdoor dining. Professional sports teams can practice and play without fans in certain counties if they have developed a COVID-19 safety plan. All state park beaches are open. State park pools are now open but at 50% capacity.

After June 26, 12 counties will move to the last phase of reopening, though Philadelphia County will leave certain restrictions in place until July 3.

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Rhode Island > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 1,571 per 100,000 people — 3rd highest (total: 16,606) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 86 per 100,000 people — 5th highest (total: 912) > Total tests administered as of June 25: 224,993 > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 2.4% — 5th smallest increase (from 16,213 to 16,606) > Est. peak date: 4/30/2020 (est. 1,451 active infections) > Population: 1,057,315

The stay-at-home order expired on May 8. People are required to wear masks indoors as well as outdoors if they can’t maintain 6 feet of distance. The state is still in phase 2 of its reopening plan. Social gatherings of no more than 15 people are allowed. Offices can open but to no more than 33% capacity. Working from home, though, is still encouraged. State park and beaches are now open, but capacity is limited.

Malls, hair salons, barbershops, and other businesses that offer personal services can reopen with restrictions. Gyms, fitness studios, and small group fitness classes are allowed to reopen but with limited capacity. Child care services can now reopen but in small groups. Summer camps and other youth summer programs will begin after June 29.

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South Carolina > Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of June 25: 548 per 100,000 people — 25th highest (total: 27,842) > COVID-19-related deaths as of June 25: 13 per 100,000 people — 22nd lowest (total: 683) > Total tests administered as of June 25: N/A > Change in trailing 7-day avg. daily cases, June 17 – June 24: 35.5% — 2nd biggest increase (from 20,551 to 27,842) > Est. peak date: 9/22/2020 (est. 2,867 active infections) > Population: 5,084,127

The stay-at-home order expired on May 4. Orders for out-of-state visitors to quarantine have also expired. Though the state of emergency order was extended, occupancy limits on retail businesses have been lifted. Bowling alleys are now open, but customers should bring their own bowling balls and shoes if possible. Traveling restrictions on visitors from high-risk areas have been lifted as well.

Residents are encouraged, but are no longer required by law, to work from home. Restaurants can choose to reopen for limited dine-in services if they follow state guidelines. Outdoor customer dining services are also allowed. Youth and adult sports leagues started practicing on May 30, and competitions are now permitted. Day camps can operate provided they comply with health and safety guidelines such as campers following physical distancing per groups.