Special Report

This Is How Many Georgia Children Live in Poverty

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As of 2019, more than 12 million U.S. children — 16.8% of all Americans under the age of 18 — were living below the poverty line in this country. This is significantly higher than the overall national poverty rate of 12.3%.

Child poverty varies widely from state to state. In some parts of the country, fewer than 10% of children live below the poverty line. In others, more than a quarter of children are impoverished. None of the six New England states have a child poverty rate exceeding the U.S. average for children of 16.8%. On the other hand, of the seven states with child poverty rates over 20%, six are in the South.

Though the federal poverty level is the same for all states and the District of Columbia, the reality is that a dollar goes much farther in some parts of the country than others. In some states, the cost of living for most families of two is less than $45,000 per year, including housing and food costs. In other states, that cost can be well over $65,000. This is the income a family really needs to avoid poverty in every state.

Children are more likely to live in poverty than adults in the U.S. The overall national poverty rate is 12.3%, but the poverty rate for those under 18 years old is 16.8%. In Georgia, the child poverty rate is higher than the national rate, at 18.7%. This is the 14th highest child poverty rate among states.

Georgia has a relatively low median household income, at $61,980. The U.S. median is $65,712. Families are much more likely to have very low incomes in Georgia compared to other states. Nationwide, 3.3% of families earn less than $10,000 per year. In Georgia, 3.7% of families live on less than $10,000 annually — tied for the 12th highest percentage of all states.

To determine the number of children living in poverty and the child poverty rate in every state, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed poverty and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Supplemental data also came from the ACS.

State Child poverty rate (%) Child poverty rate rank Total children in poverty Median Household Income ($) Overall poverty rate (%)
Alabama 21.4 6th highest 228,412 51,734 15.5
Alaska 13.0 14th lowest – tied 22,921 75,463 10.1
Arizona 19.1 13th highest 308,459 62,055 13.5
Arkansas 22.1 4th highest 151,448 48,952 16.2
California 15.6 24th highest 1,363,574 80,440 11.8
Colorado 10.9 5th lowest 135,405 77,127 9.3
Connecticut 14.1 22nd lowest 101,233 78,833 10.0
Delaware 16.4 22nd highest 32,277 70,176 11.3
Florida 17.7 17th highest 737,415 59,227 12.7
Georgia 18.7 14th highest 461,456 61,980 13.3
Hawaii 12.4 13th lowest 36,461 83,102 9.3
Idaho 13.2 17th lowest 58,188 60,999 11.2
Illinois 15.7 23rd highest 436,327 69,187 11.5
Indiana 15.2 25th highest 230,725 57,603 11.9
Iowa 13.0 14th lowest – tied 92,018 61,691 11.2
Kansas 14.7 23rd lowest 101,094 62,087 11.4
Kentucky 21.7 5th highest 212,130 52,295 16.3
Louisiana 27.0 2nd highest 288,732 51,073 19.0
Maine 13.8 20th lowest 32,746 58,924 10.9
Maryland 12.0 10th lowest – tied 156,992 86,738 9.0
Massachusetts 11.6 8th lowest – tied 154,457 85,843 9.4
Michigan 17.6 18th highest 371,020 59,584 13.0
Minnesota 11.2 7th lowest 143,006 74,593 9.0
Mississippi 28.1 the highest 192,413 45,792 19.6
Missouri 17.1 19th highest 229,336 57,409 12.9
Montana 14.9 24th lowest 32,888 57,153 12.6
Nebraska 11.0 6th lowest 51,085 63,229 9.9
Nevada 16.9 20th highest – tied 114,886 63,276 12.5
New Hampshire 7.1 the lowest 17,609 77,933 7.3
New Jersey 12.3 12th lowest 235,470 85,751 9.2
New Mexico 24.9 3rd highest 115,997 51,945 18.2
New York 18.1 16th highest 711,686 72,108 13.0
North Carolina 19.5 11th highest 440,230 57,341 13.6
North Dakota 10.2 3rd lowest – tied 17,823 64,577 10.6
Ohio 18.4 15th highest 466,168 58,642 13.1
Oklahoma 19.9 8th highest 186,392 54,449 15.2
Oregon 13.1 16th lowest 110,323 67,058 11.4
Pennsylvania 16.9 20th highest – tied 434,904 63,463 12.0
Rhode Island 14.0 21st lowest 28,009 71,169 10.8
South Carolina 19.7 9th highest – tied 214,772 56,227 13.8
South Dakota 15.0 25th lowest 31,425 59,533 11.9
Tennessee 19.7 9th highest – tied 290,815 56,071 13.9
Texas 19.2 12th highest 1,400,918 64,034 13.6
Utah 9.9 2nd lowest 91,433 75,780 8.9
Vermont 10.2 3rd lowest – tied 11,320 63,001 10.2
Virginia 13.4 18th lowest 244,953 76,456 9.9
Washington 12.0 10th lowest – tied 196,520 78,687 9.8
West Virginia 20.1 7th highest 69,975 48,850 16.0
Wisconsin 13.5 19th lowest 167,605 64,168 10.4
Wyoming 11.6 8th lowest – tied 15,088 65,003 10.1

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