Special Report

20 Places Hit Hardest by This Spring's Record Flooding

Source: Photo by Scott Olson / Getty Images

16. Tarkio

In Missouri, NOAA said major flooding is likely in the Tarkio River basin. Tarkio is a non-navigable waterway that flows for about 140 miles from Iowa to the Missouri River in Missouri.

Missouri Farm Bureau President Blake Hurst told online news site Missourinet that flooding in Missouri in March would have a more adverse effect on farmers in northwest Missouri than the flood in 2011.

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17. Nishnabotna

The Nishnabotna River basin in Missouri is forecast to have major flooding this spring. The name “Nishnabotna” comes from an Otoe word meaning “canoe-making river.”

Source: Creative Commons / Wikimedia Commons

18. Nodaway River basin

Nodaway River basin in Missouri is forecast to experience major flooding this spring. The name comes from the Otoe-Missouria word meaning “jump over water.”

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19. Platte River to the confluence of the Missouri River

The Platte River to the confluence of the Missouri River is predicted to experience flooding this spring. Colonel John Hudson, commander of the Omaha, Nebraska District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said the engineers were focused on repairing dams damaged by flood waters along the Missouri River in March. He cited a rupture in a levee at the confluence of the Platte and Missouri rivers in Iowa that was 400 yards wide and 60 feet deep.

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20. Missouri River to Gavins Point Dam to Kansas City

The Missouri River to Gavins Point Dam to Kansas City, which is about 362 miles, is forecast to have flooding episodes this spring. Earlier this spring, the Gavins Point Dam, about four miles west of Yankton, South Dakota, increased water releases to leave room for Lewis and Clark Lake to accommodate runoff from heavy rainfall and snowmelt upstream.