What Every Presidential Candidate’s Last Name Means

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You might think that the 21 Democratic candidates for president in 2020 (actually 20 — Bernie Sanders is an Independent), plus a couple over on the other side, represent an almost bewilderingly large field confronting voters.

That’s just the tip of the rapidly melting iceberg, however. According to a Ballotpedia rundown of registered candidates for next year’s election, as of August 19, some 823 people had filed to run next year with the Federal Election Commission, including 275 Democrats, 118 Republicans, 36 Libertarians, and 15 Green Party members.

That’s not to mention an assortment of Independents and nonpartisans, as well as representatives of the Constitution Party, the Human Rights Party, the Prohibition Party, and more. You might be surprised to learn about the political parties that won votes in the 2016 election.

Among those apparently poised to compete for the nation’s highest office, in addition to some more familiar names, are Chocolate Pancakes (Republican), Cocaine (nonpartisan), Elvis Master Butler (People Over Politics), Kanye Deez Nutz West (Green), Pew Die Pie (Communist), Refino Pig (Republican), Seven the Dog (nonpartisan), Sexy Vegan (Independent), and Vermin Supreme (Libertarian).

We can only speculate as to where some of these monikers came from. In the case of those aforementioned 21 main Democratic/Independent competitors, however, and of Donald Trump and his sole potential challenger in the Republican primary, Bill Weld, it is indeed possible to discover the origins of their names.

The results might tell us at least a little bit about each man and woman — even if the information isn’t as important as learning which candidates are spending the most and the least in their efforts to get elected.

Click here to learn what every presidential candidate’s last name means.

However diverse the roster of candidates might be, a majority of them have names that originate in England, Scotland, or Ireland. One has Semitic roots, a couple are Slavic, and only one is Asian. They derive from occupations, locales, physical characteristics, virtues, and relationships to ancestors. Some bespeak noble characteristics. Others are less complimentary. One of them, however, is going to be a name that figures large in our future as a nation.

To learn the origins of the candidates’ last names, 24/7 Tempo consulted the websites Ancestry.com, SurnameDB, House of Names, Geneanet, and Forebears, as well as individual family historical websites and the Oxford English Dictionary. In cases where the etymology of a name is disputed, various possibilities are given.