Special Report

Income It Takes to Be Considered Middle Class in Every State

Methodology

To determine the income it takes for a family to be considered middle class in every state, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed data on the upper and lower bounds of U.S. household income quintiles from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2018 American Community Survey. The boundaries of the three middle income quintiles for the U.S. as a whole were adjusted for state-level cost of living using regional price parity (RPP) data for 2017 from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The RPP-adjusted boundaries were defined as the range of income that could be considered middle class in a given state. Data on median household income, the percentage of households earning $10,000 or less, the percentage of households earning $200,000 or more, median home value, and the Gini index of income inequality came from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2018 American Community Survey.