Josie Green

Josie Green is a farmer, foodie and freelance writer who covers topics including food, travel, social movements, and science.

Her work has been featured online at USA Today, MSN, Business Telegraph, Fresh World News, Common Sense Interpretation, Knox News, The Arizona Republic, Burlington Free Press, Ithaca Journal, Florida Today, Detroit Free Press, Ventura County Star, Cincinnati Enquirer, Desert Sun, North Jersey.com, Stevens Point Journal, Commercial Appeal, Sheboygan Press, Marion Star, The Californian, Clarion Ledger, Reno Gazette Journal, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, App.com, Des Moines Register, Coloradoan, and All About World Heritage Sites.

She studied neuroscience at Oberlin College and has 14 years of organic farming experience, including work with an urban agriculture and social justice non-profit. She is also a professional chocolatier with over a decade of experience in artisan food production.

Lastest Stories by Josie Green

Arsenic, cyanide, mercury…what do they have in common? These naturally occurring chemical elements and compounds can all be fatal if ingested in large doses. Chemicals found in certain plants (such...
Fast traffic, narrow sidewalks, and not a single pedestrian crossing in sight; some neighborhoods are not only unpleasant places to try to walk your dog — they’re downright dangerous. Without...
According to a report published by Statista, over 202 million Americans ate bagels in 2020.  Although bagel lovers are passionate about what makes a good one – most will cite a crispy exterior and...
Often the greenest and most stunning places in an urban environment, botanical gardens serve as recreational areas where the public can interface with the natural world in a context that inspires awe...
Every year, cities around the world are devastated by natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes. Although modern technology has given us earthquake-proof buildings, urban flood...
In September of 2020, while searching for a funerary temple of Tutankhamun, a team of Egyptian archaeologists stumbled upon a remarkably well-preserved city buried under the sand near Luxor. As they...
Bridges, used since Neolithic times, are pragmatic structures that are often purely utilitarian — stone, concrete, or steel and brutal — the cheapest way to allow passage over a chasm or...
As far back as Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, kings, believed to be divinely appointed, ruled society. Ancient monarchies and dynasties often bequeathed the crown patrilineally, or through male...
In good times and bad, people have always made desserts. Sweets are a treat that many of us look forward to, and throughout history, home cooks have created cakes, pastries, pies, and other decadent...
Remember when margarine was healthier than butter? That was before studies revealed how unhealthy synthetic trans fats can be. Nutrition science is constantly changing, and with it, the reputations...
Every year, cities around the world are devastated by natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes. Although modern technology has given us earthquake-proof buildings, urban flood...
As a teenager, Saul Hudson, the performer best known as the lead guitarist for Guns ‘N Roses, was nicknamed Slash by his friend’s father — actor Seymour Cassel — because he was always...
While a handful of famous rap and hip hop artists have opted to use their real names on stage — Talib Kweli and Kendrick Lamar, to name two — it is far more common for them to use a stage...
Pirates — those who plunder ships at sea or use their ships to attack and pillage ports and coastal settlements — have been around since at least as early as 1400 B.C. and they’re still...
The COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns in 2020 led to over 9 million U.S. workers losing their jobs. Of those who didn’t, some took pay cuts or had their employment hours reduced. This put...