Special Report

The Most Iconic Foods Every State Has Given the Rest of the US

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Minnesota
> Iconic food: Honeycrisp apple

The ever-crispy, extremely juicy, barely tart honeycrisp apple was developed by scientists at the University of Minnesota in the 1960s and finally introduced to the market in the 1990s. It is now a fall favorite across the country.

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Mississippi
> Iconic food: Mississippi mud pie

Resembling the muddy banks of the Mississippi River, this pie consists of multiple layers of chocolate — from the cookie crust, to a dense layer of cake, to a rich chocolate pudding, topped with whipped cream.

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Missouri
> Iconic food: Gooey butter cake

Invented in St. Louis in the 1930s or 1940s, gooey butter cake consists of a bottom cake layer with a chewy, pudding-like filling and a delicate crisp top.

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Montana
> Iconic food: Huckleberry pie

Often confused with blueberries, huckleberries are a wild berry with crunchier seeds, thicker skin, and more acidity than blueberries. Native to the Northwest, these berries have developed a sort of cult following in Montana, and huckleberry pie is served statewide during harvest season.

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Nebraska
> Iconic food: Kool-Aid

After an inventor in Hastings gave up on trying to market his liquid fruit drink concentrate, he found a way to dehydrate it into a powder and it eventually became Kool-Aid.

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